Food & Fitness After 50: Fish Oil Supplements

We’ve been exploring the benefits of seafood in the diet (for the previous posts click here and here). Today let’s answer your questions on fish oil supplements.

As a quick reminder, health organizations like the American Heart Association recommend at least 2 servings (a serving is equal to 3.5-ounces) of fatty fish twice each week to get the recommended 250-500 milligrams of omega-3 fatty acids of EPA and DHA (sometimes referred to simply as fish oils). But there is nothing simple about sorting through the many fish oil supplements on the market for those who don’t eat enough fatty fish. Add to that, trying to wade through the sea of health claims and understanding the label is even trickier. I checked in with Senya Joerss, Technical Manager for Trident Seafoods Corporation to ask about fish oil and omega-3 supplements.

While I don’t want this to turn into an organic chemistry lesson, this infographic can help explain the different types of omega-3-fats. While we tend to lump them together under the umbrella of omega-3s, what we are really after are the EPA and DHA, the two omega-3s that have been extensively studied to promote heart, brain, and eye health.

 

ALA-EPA-DHA-infographic

That leads to the first question on the various formulations on the market.

Question: Is salmon oil a better choice for a supplement than other omega-3s on the market?

Salmon oil contains a good amount of omega-3s but some fish contain more (sardines and mackerel for example). But, the omega-3 content of fish is dependent on what the fish eat. Salmon is one of the fattier fishes and therefore salmon oil is a good choice for a supplement due to its omega-3 content. As a consumer, that means you can take fewer capsules. Also, salmon oil is a natural form of the fats meaning better absorption, so it gets in to the blood stream more readily. Joerss responded this way, “Trident’s product, Pure Alaska Omega Wild Alaskan Salmon Oil delivers the same whole fat omega nutrition as eating two portions of cooked wild salmon per week; it’s the closest supplement option when you cannot eat fish for dinner.” And while the health benefits of EPA and DHA are what we are after, Joerss states that “fatty fish, like salmon, contain many other fatty acids and omega fats (examples: Omega-7, Omega-9, Omega-11 fatty acids) that are not as well researched as EPA and DHA fatty acids, but there is a plethora of evidence to support overall health for populations eating fatty fish regularly.” She believes there is a synergistic effect in consuming multiple fats together to provide balance. So, while eating fatty fish is the best way to get the health benefits, salmon oil is the next best thing.

Question: How do you read a nutrition label for fish oil. I find it confusing. For example, the front of the bottle says 1000 milligrams yet the supplement facts panel on the back of the bottle says 2 softgels contain 600 milligrams of omega-3s.

Joerss understands the confusion and says “it is challenging for the consumers to interpret fish oil labels because they all look slightly different.” For Trident’s product, what you are taking is “Salmon Oil” so that is the name of the product and the largest font callout on the front of the label. The 1,000 mg is the amount of Salmon Oil you get with each softgel. This is typically the way “Fish Oils” are marketed especially if the oil is not refined because fish oil contains more than omega-3 fatty acids. (Another example would be “Cod Liver Oil” softgel products, they list the amount of cod liver oil consumed per unit or per softgel on the front, so you know how much cod liver oil each unit/softgel delivers).

PAO_Salmon-Oil_Costco.com_v7FAThe suggested serving size for the Pure Alaska Omega Wild Salmon Oil is 2 softgels which is 2,000 mg (2 grams) of salmon oil per serving. The salmon oil omega-3 content, other fatty acid contents, vitamin content (A & D), and other fat-soluble compounds remain present in the same portions and amounts you would find in the lipid (fatty) portion of wild salmon.” Which is why the amount of EPA + DHA don’t add up to 1000 milligrams.

However, Joerss adds that “while there are some products that do not list EPA and DHA exclusively on the label all fish oils should include a total omega-3 value.” She explains that some products, like “whole omega” fish oil calls out only total omega-3s because it is a natural product.

Watch out for the claim that omega-3 supplements contain a certain percent of the Daily Value or DV.   This is a meaningless claim because there is no Daily Value set by the USDA or FDA for fish oils. You will find a DV for nutrients like vitamin D, but not for fish oil.

Question: What is astaxanthin and is that unique in fish oil products?

Astaxanthin is an antioxidant or carotenoid found in bacteria and algae. It gives the pink color to shrimp and salmon and other crustaceans. Joerss explains that “astaxanthin is present in wild fish that eat and feed freely on algae and other fish in nature. Salmon oil that is cold-pressed, similar to extra-virgin olive oil, uses an extraction process that preserves the astaxanthin that is present in the wild salmon – so that is unique compared to most other fish oils which remove this as part of the refining/concentration process.” However, Joerss points out that astaxanthin in Trident’s salmon is oil is small when compared to products that add this carotenoid to their fish oil supplement.

Question: Is there a fish oil for vegans?

Algal oil is a good option for vegans. Algae is where fish get their EPA and DHA so oil made from algae can supply omega-3s to plant-based eaters. Algal oil is more costly than other fish oils but can meet the needs of vegans.

Question: Many people complain of a fishy aftertaste when taking fish oil…any tips for reducing the after taste (i.e., taking with meals, taking at a certain time of day, refrigerating the capsules?)

Some people do complain with the “fish burb” or aftertaste, but Joerss recommends taking the supplement at the beginning of a meal and a substantial meal, like lunch or dinner would be best. “Some people report taking it with orange juice, but I do not think oil and seafood typically pair nicely together with OJ!” She adds that “we do not recommend freezing or refrigerating the capsules because that will prolong the rupture time of the softgel. If the softgel does not rupture soon after being swallowed that is less time for your body to absorb the nutrients within each softgel.

For more information and resources for omega-3s, check out Trident’s brand, Pure Alaska Omega and also the website for the Global Organization for EPA and DHA Omega-3s or GOED.

For more information on eating well in your 50s, 60s, 70s, and beyond, check out Food & Fitness After 50.

Disclosure: I was a guest of Trident Seafoods, Women of Seafood, to learn more about wild Alaska fishing. However, I was not asked to write this post or compensated to do so.

Copyright © 2019 [Christine Rosenbloom]. All Rights Reserved.

 

 

Food & Fitness After 50: Alaska Adventure, Part 1

I just returned from a week-long adventure in Alaska, thanks to Trident Seafoods “Women of Seafood” program. The goal of the sponsored travel is education, fishing, and fellowship and all three objectives were met with resounding success.

Prior to my trip, I asked you what you wanted to know about seafood and you responded with thoughtful, probing questions. I sorted the questions into three buckets: nutritional benefits of seafood, issues surrounding sustainability of fishing, and clarification on fish oil supplements. I will be following up with all three of these categories in future posts, but today I want to give you a flavor of the trip.

When I tell people I just returned from Alaska, the first thing they ask is “were you on a cruise?” Well, if you count being on trawler in the Bering Sea a cruise, then yes! But, this “cruise” took me to parts of Alaska that the average cruise ship doesn’t go, and most people don’t see.

IMG_5254We started the trip in Seattle, where we did a tour of the famous Pike Place Market, where I was challenged to catch a fish at the Pike Place Fish Market, the only fish I caught that week! We were introduced to two local restaurants, known for their delicious seafood, Staple & Fancy for dinner and Serious Biscuit for breakfast the following morning before heading off to King Salmon airport in Bristol Bay, Alaska.

Upon landing, we toured the Naknek production facility to watch sockeye salmon processing…from fresh fish off the boat to frozen fish, fish meal, and fish oil, all within hours of the catch. Many of us don’t know how our food gets from sea to table and seeing the operation gave me a new appreciation of fisherman and processors. This plant runs 24/7 during salmon season to give us the highest quality fish. After the tour we headed to a lodge on the Naknek River for a wonderful dinner of, you guessed it, salmon.

 

handOne of the questions you asked was about the different types of salmon. An easy way to remember it is to look at your hand.

  • Thumb, rhymes with Chum (also called Keta)
  • The space between your thumb and index finger looks like a sock, so think of Sockeye (also called Red)
  • The middle finger is the largest, so that is for King Salmon (also called Chinook)
  • We wear rings on the ring finger (often silver rings), so think of Silver Salmon (also called Coho)
  • And, of course, the pinkie is for Pink Salmon

The next day we donned waders and took to skiffs to fish for Sockeye; my first experience with fly fishing and it wasn’t easy! Obviously, not easy because I didn’t catch anything. But, only one person in our group caught a Sockeye, so I’m blaming it on the 90-degree heat! I think the fish just wanted to swim in deeper, cooler water since it seems that I brought the Georgia weather with me to Alaska!

IMG_2529In the afternoon we took a float plane to Katmai National Park and hiked the bear trail to Brooks Falls to watch the bears fishing for salmon. They didn’t have any better luck than I did, but it was amazing to see them in action! As we were getting ready to board our float plane, we had a slight delay as a momma bear took her two cubs for a lakeside stroll. No one wants to come between a mom and her cubs!

IMG_2541 (2)

IMG_2555The next day we took a flight to Dutch Harbor, midway down the Aleutian Island chain, and were lucky to find a catcher/processor vessel in the harbor for a tour. These vessels catch the fish and process it all on board before off loading the frozen fish in the harbor. Amazing to tour the boat as the cargo was being delivered to the dock. The number one thing I remember about the tour was how clean it was…. cleaner than my own kitchen! The dedication to food safety (as well as safety of the crew) is remarkable.

IMG_2613After the tour our “cruise” began; we boarded the Fishing Vessel (F/V) Sovereignty, heading out to fish for wild Alaska Pollock, heading to Akutan. If you’ve ever watched Deadliest Catch, you might recognize this view of Akutan, the largest primary fish processing facility in North America. The Pollock were not cooperating as they were further west and north, so we couldn’t drop the net, but we were entertained by a pod of humpback whales (at least 40 of them!) scooping herring into their huge jaws! IMG_2604

Touring the plant, a mini-city, as they processed Pollock at lightning speed was amazing. They also process surimi and fish oil. After a long day (dusk is about 11:30 in Alaska this time of year), we crashed in Akutan. Fog blanketed the island and the only way back to Dutch Harbor was to board the trawler at 5 AM for another 5-hour trip. (There is no airstrip on the island….only a helicopter pad.) The crew was so gracious to the eight women on board; preparing delicious meals for 2 days! I never expected to eat shrimp ceviche on a fishing vessel in the Bering Sea!

Our flight out of Alaska took us to Anacortes, Washington to tour a secondary processing plant. This is where the frozen fish meets battering and breading, depending on what the customer wants. From Costco and Sam’s Club to quick service restaurants to food service in schools and other institutions, you’ve probably had seafood from the Bering Sea!

Our last stop was in Seattle at the Trident Innovation Center where we got a peek, and a taste, of innovative products that will be coming to market in the future. We also heard from the Seafood Nutrition Partnership and the Alaska Seafoods Marketing Institute and many of your questions were answered.

20190712_200138The last night focused all on the fellowship as we relived our adventures and enjoyed the new friendships we made. We dined at the famous Ray’s and were joined by Captain Josh Harris. I never thought I would be learning to crack Alaska King Crab legs with the Deadliest Catch star!

I’m working on new posts to answer all of your questions, so stay tuned! But, for now, eat more seafood, because it does make you smarter and prettier!

Very special thanks to our Trident hosts, amazing Women of Seafood, Ana and Christine!20190712_171253

For more information on eating well, moving well, and being well check out Food & Fitness After 50.

Copyright © 2019 [Christine Rosenbloom]. All Rights Reserved.