How this Dietitian is Snacking on Super Bowl Sunday

I recently attended a conferchili_012610p10104141ence where both turkey (National Turkey Federation) and beans (Bush Brothers and Company) sponsored scientific sessions. I was not asked to write this post, do not serve as a consultant for either company, nor was I compensated for writing this article.

I am excited for the Atlanta Falcons playing in the big game on Sunday, and with the game comes parties and snacks, lots of snacks.  According to some sources, 49 million cases of beer, 100 million chicken wings, and 139 million avocados (for guacamole, of course) will be purchased in the days leading up to the Super Bowl. But, this year, I’m taking two of my favorite foods in that quintessential football dish to a Super Bowl party…chili. Not just any chili, but one with ground turkey and black beans.

Ground turkey breast is a great canvas for chili as it takes on the flavors from the tomatoes and spices and contributes to texture, taste, and nutrition. Turkey is a great source of lean protein without the excess saturated fat of other popular chili meats. Beans are also a good source of protein with the added benefit of containing soluble fiber. Bean have super powers: as part of a healthful diet, beans can lower blood sugar, blood pressure, blood lipids, and increase satiety (that means you might not look longingly at the platter of wings because you are full and satisfied after eating a bowl of my chili!) Associate professor of nutritional sciences and researcher on the health benefits of beans and peas at the University of Toronto, Dr. John Sievenpiper, is also a staff physician. He sees patients with diabetes and heart disease and those at high risk for developing chronic diseases. He writes prescriptions for his patients to eat a healthful diet (the “portfolio diet”) including beans and peas for the protein and fiber. I wish more doctors would write prescriptions for healthy diets! (For more information on the Portfolio Diet see http://portfoliodietplan.com/ )

Enjoy the chili and the game, and, of course, we will be hoping the Falcons come home with a victory.

Turkey Black Bean Chili (I’m not sure of the origins of this dish, but I’ve been making it for many years)

16-ounces of ground turkey breast

1 medium onion, chopped

2 Tablespoons of chili powder

Dash or red pepper flakes

½ teaspoon cumin

½ teaspoon salt

2 cans diced tomatoes (I like the diced tomatoes for chili)

1 can black beans, drained and rinsed

1 cup frozen or canned (drained) whole kernel corn

14-ounces unsalted chicken stock

Brown turkey over medium heat and separate into crumbles; cook and stir for about 7 minutes or until turkey is browned. Stir in onion and spices and continuing cooking for a few minutes. Add tomatoes, beans, corn, and stock and bring to a low boil. Transfer to chili to a crock pot and cook on low for several hours or until ready to serve at the Super Bowl party. Top with grated cheddar or jalapeno jack cheese, plain Greek yogurt, and a dash of hot sauce for those who like chili extra spicy.

Makes 6-8 servings

 

Food Trends Recognizing Aging

I was excited to see that one of Mintel’s 2011 “megatrends” is recognition of the demographic shifts and the aging workforce.

http://www.foodnavigator.com/Financial-Industry/Demographic-shifts-to-determine-food-trends-in-2011-Mintel

Today’s food products are geared toward the youth (think energy drinks) but Mintel predicts that more products will be targeting “vitality and health” for those of us who are older. And why not, given that the number of us in the U.S. aged 45 to 64 who will reach 65 over the next 20 years has increased by 31% in the last decade. Baby boomers are more likely to be active, too. The Health Club industry says adults age 55+ comprise a quarter of health club memberships. From 1998 to 2005 those over 55 joined gyms–33% increase from earlier years while the 18 to 34 year old age group showed no increase.

Here is my wish list of products that I would like to see the food industry develop and market to older adults:

  • Half loaf of whole wheat bread (I can never finish a whole loaf of bread and bread just doesn’t freeze well)
  • Sports drinks with lower carbs (4% range) without being sickly sweet with fake sugars (older adults were diluting sports drinks long before sports drink makers came up with “light” versions but those are still too sweet tasting. This reminds me of Dr. Randy Eichner, retired team doc for the University of Oklahoma Sooners, who encouraged Gatorade to make a drink for older adults and call it “Later Gator.”)
  • Lower sodium everything products while at the same time increasing potassium; both nutrients are important for managing blood pressure.
  • Yogurt with more calcium and vitamin D. At a recent food conference I tasted Yoplait yogurt that is being introduced soon and it will have 50% of the daily value for calcium and vitamin D–great job. Most people are surprised to learn that only a a couple of yogurt brands have any vitamin D. And Greek yogurt (which I love) has more protein than regular yogurt, but less calcium and no vitamin D.

We might be “older, lower, and slower” (a slogan used by some master athletes who pole vault at senior games) but we have the financial means to purchase food products that help us stay vital and healthy.