Food & Fitness After 50: Fun with An Air Fryer

It all started at the beginning of the stay-at-home orders. Like a good dietitian, I took stock of what was in my freezer, fridge, and pantry and planned meals around what was on hand. I mentioned to my husband that we had some Wild Alaska Pollock and Wild Caught Cod filets in the freezer. His response? “I wish I could have fried fish. I love fried fish.” I don’t fry foods and when it comes to fish, I prefer grilling. But it made me think of air frying and with one click, the Ninja AF 101 Air Fryer was in my cart and ready to be shipped.

I have no affiliation with Ninja products but after reading some reviews on consumer websites, the product looked good and the price was right. Once it arrived, it was love at first bite. Using the cooking guide that came with the book I found coating almost anything in flour, egg, and panko breadcrumbs is delicious.

Air Fryer Cookbook for Dummies

514G1VUZdAL._SX397_BO1,204,203,200_Then, serendipity! One of my colleagues, Elizabeth Shaw (@ShawSimpleSwaps), posed a question on social media asking about favorite kitchen appliances and I didn’t think twice as I typed in “air fryer.” She had just published a book with, Wendy Jo Peterson (@Just_WendyJo) called, Air Fryer Cookbook for Dummies (John Wiley & Sons, 2020) and offered to send me a press copy.

So, disclosure, the press copy was free, and I wanted to share my thoughts on the book and the recipes. First, a brief introduction to Wendy Jo and Liz. Wendy Jo is a culinary dietitian, a writer, speaker, and recipe developer. Her clients range from military to musicians and she is known as the “Fuelin’ Roadie” for innovation with recipes. She is the author of numerous books. Liz Shaw is also a registered dietitian and her brand is Shaw Simple Swaps. She is a culinary expert and her mission is getting people to enjoy food and make small changes to reap big rewards. Please visit their websites for amazing recipes and other great food and nutrition information.

Too Many Great Recipes to Choose From!

But, back to the book. The first thing I liked about the recipes is the use of ingredients you are likely to have in your kitchen…important in a pandemic when we are not out shopping in specialty grocery stores and online delivery is hit or miss. You won’t find cold-pressed, double-filtered organic grapeseed oil or any other hard to find (and expensive to buy) ingredient in any of the recipes….thank you Liz and Wendy Jo.

I flipped through the recipes and truly I wanted to try them all, but I settled on one from each section and using ingredients I had in my house. First up was “Crispy Fried Chicken,” and it didn’t disappoint. I had thinly sliced chicken breasts in the freezer, so I cut them into strips for chicken tenders. I found that my 4-quart air fryer cooks a bit faster than the recipe times call for, so some trial to adjust cooking times is in order. I loved how crispy and golden brown the chicken turned out. Each recipe has notes, tips, and suggestion on how to vary it. We made a dipping sauce with honey and mustard, using one of the tips.

fishingOn to that “fried” fish my husband was craving. I got lucky because my brother-in-law hired a fishing guide to take them out on our lake to hook some fresh fish. As you can see in the photo, the trip was a success and we had bass filets ready for the Air Fryer. I tried the recipe, “Lightened Up Breaded-Fish Filets.” It was equally as good as the fresh salmon I had in Alaska last summer. Can’t wait to try it with my frozen filets, too.

AF FD - Tuna Melt 2
Tuna Melt

Next up was another of my husband’s favorite dishes, Eggplant Parmesan, and he declared it excellent, although he suggested we add some gooey, melty fresh mozzarella cheese next time we make it. Last night, for a quick dinner we tried the Tuna Melt and it was grilled to perfection.

Side dishes are a snap in the Air Fryer and there are plenty of recipes for veggies. The Crispy Herb Potatoes beats French Fries any day and I love the chapter on “Ten (or so) No-Recipe Recipes that Make Perfect Sides.” From Brussels Sprout to Zucchini, you can quickly make a tasty side dish to accompany any entrée. I tried the Brussels Sprouts with Bacon this past weekend and I could have eaten the entire dish by myself!

My only “fail” was in the baking section. I tried Cinnamon Sugar Donut Holes, but they were dry. Good flavor, but crumbly texture. I know I will need to adjust temperatures and times to fit my Air Fryer when baking.

Tips and Tricks

In addition to the recipes, the authors give loads of tips and tricks for using an Air Fryer. As a newbie to this device, I found helpful information to get the best results from my Air Fryer. For example, they suggest coating the basket with olive oil instead of using popular cooking sprays. Commercial cooking sprays contain chemicals that can corrode the basket, so I ordered an inexpensive mister and filled it with olive oil to keep foods from sticking.

They also recommend using a meat thermometer to insure proper cooking temperatures. I always recommend using a meat thermometer instead of guessing if the food is done. Not only does using a meat thermometer help you avoid under-cooked food, but it also prevents over cooking.

Additional Benefits for Older Adults

As many older adults find themselves empty-nesters, I think an Air Fryer is a perfect appliance for healthy, quick meals for one or two people Using it for delicious veggie sides or dehydrating veggies for chips (I have not tried the dehydration setting yet!), it is easy to use and easy to clean.

Some people describe an Air Fryer as just another convection oven, but I find it easier to use than the convection oven setting. Cooking times in the Air Fryer are faster than the oven and the food comes out crispy on the outside but tender on the inside.

I live in the south where there is an affinity for fried foods. An Air Fryer gives you the taste of fried food without the excess calories and saturated fat. Another plus is that cooking with an Air Fryer keeps the kitchen cool. No one wants to turn on a hot oven or sweat over a greasy frying pan on a summer day in Georgia.

While I am not an RVer, many of my friends are, and in the Air Fryer Cheat Sheet for Dummies the authors suggest it is a great appliance for the RV lifestyle.

If you’ve got an Air Fryer hiding in a closet, dig it out and try some of these great recipes. And, if you are like me and looking to try something new, I recommend an Air Fryer and Liz and Wendy Jo’s cookbook! A big thanks to Wendy Jo and Liz for showing me all the ways to use my favorite new purchase.

Dr. Christine Rosenbloom is a registered dietitian nutritionist and a nutrition professor emerita at Georgia State University in Atlanta. Along with Dr. Bob Murray, she is the author of Food & Fitness After 50.

Copyright © 2019 [Christine Rosenbloom]. All Rights Reserved

 

Food & Fitness After 50: Fish Oil Supplements

We’ve been exploring the benefits of seafood in the diet (for the previous posts click here and here). Today let’s answer your questions on fish oil supplements.

As a quick reminder, health organizations like the American Heart Association recommend at least 2 servings (a serving is equal to 3.5-ounces) of fatty fish twice each week to get the recommended 250-500 milligrams of omega-3 fatty acids of EPA and DHA (sometimes referred to simply as fish oils). But there is nothing simple about sorting through the many fish oil supplements on the market for those who don’t eat enough fatty fish. Add to that, trying to wade through the sea of health claims and understanding the label is even trickier. I checked in with Senya Joerss, Technical Manager for Trident Seafoods Corporation to ask about fish oil and omega-3 supplements.

While I don’t want this to turn into an organic chemistry lesson, this infographic can help explain the different types of omega-3-fats. While we tend to lump them together under the umbrella of omega-3s, what we are really after are the EPA and DHA, the two omega-3s that have been extensively studied to promote heart, brain, and eye health.

 

ALA-EPA-DHA-infographic

That leads to the first question on the various formulations on the market.

Question: Is salmon oil a better choice for a supplement than other omega-3s on the market?

Salmon oil contains a good amount of omega-3s but some fish contain more (sardines and mackerel for example). But, the omega-3 content of fish is dependent on what the fish eat. Salmon is one of the fattier fishes and therefore salmon oil is a good choice for a supplement due to its omega-3 content. As a consumer, that means you can take fewer capsules. Also, salmon oil is a natural form of the fats meaning better absorption, so it gets in to the blood stream more readily. Joerss responded this way, “Trident’s product, Pure Alaska Omega Wild Alaskan Salmon Oil delivers the same whole fat omega nutrition as eating two portions of cooked wild salmon per week; it’s the closest supplement option when you cannot eat fish for dinner.” And while the health benefits of EPA and DHA are what we are after, Joerss states that “fatty fish, like salmon, contain many other fatty acids and omega fats (examples: Omega-7, Omega-9, Omega-11 fatty acids) that are not as well researched as EPA and DHA fatty acids, but there is a plethora of evidence to support overall health for populations eating fatty fish regularly.” She believes there is a synergistic effect in consuming multiple fats together to provide balance. So, while eating fatty fish is the best way to get the health benefits, salmon oil is the next best thing.

Question: How do you read a nutrition label for fish oil. I find it confusing. For example, the front of the bottle says 1000 milligrams yet the supplement facts panel on the back of the bottle says 2 softgels contain 600 milligrams of omega-3s.

Joerss understands the confusion and says “it is challenging for the consumers to interpret fish oil labels because they all look slightly different.” For Trident’s product, what you are taking is “Salmon Oil” so that is the name of the product and the largest font callout on the front of the label. The 1,000 mg is the amount of Salmon Oil you get with each softgel. This is typically the way “Fish Oils” are marketed especially if the oil is not refined because fish oil contains more than omega-3 fatty acids. (Another example would be “Cod Liver Oil” softgel products, they list the amount of cod liver oil consumed per unit or per softgel on the front, so you know how much cod liver oil each unit/softgel delivers).

PAO_Salmon-Oil_Costco.com_v7FAThe suggested serving size for the Pure Alaska Omega Wild Salmon Oil is 2 softgels which is 2,000 mg (2 grams) of salmon oil per serving. The salmon oil omega-3 content, other fatty acid contents, vitamin content (A & D), and other fat-soluble compounds remain present in the same portions and amounts you would find in the lipid (fatty) portion of wild salmon.” Which is why the amount of EPA + DHA don’t add up to 1000 milligrams.

However, Joerss adds that “while there are some products that do not list EPA and DHA exclusively on the label all fish oils should include a total omega-3 value.” She explains that some products, like “whole omega” fish oil calls out only total omega-3s because it is a natural product.

Watch out for the claim that omega-3 supplements contain a certain percent of the Daily Value or DV.   This is a meaningless claim because there is no Daily Value set by the USDA or FDA for fish oils. You will find a DV for nutrients like vitamin D, but not for fish oil.

Question: What is astaxanthin and is that unique in fish oil products?

Astaxanthin is an antioxidant or carotenoid found in bacteria and algae. It gives the pink color to shrimp and salmon and other crustaceans. Joerss explains that “astaxanthin is present in wild fish that eat and feed freely on algae and other fish in nature. Salmon oil that is cold-pressed, similar to extra-virgin olive oil, uses an extraction process that preserves the astaxanthin that is present in the wild salmon – so that is unique compared to most other fish oils which remove this as part of the refining/concentration process.” However, Joerss points out that astaxanthin in Trident’s salmon is oil is small when compared to products that add this carotenoid to their fish oil supplement.

Question: Is there a fish oil for vegans?

Algal oil is a good option for vegans. Algae is where fish get their EPA and DHA so oil made from algae can supply omega-3s to plant-based eaters. Algal oil is more costly than other fish oils but can meet the needs of vegans.

Question: Many people complain of a fishy aftertaste when taking fish oil…any tips for reducing the after taste (i.e., taking with meals, taking at a certain time of day, refrigerating the capsules?)

Some people do complain with the “fish burb” or aftertaste, but Joerss recommends taking the supplement at the beginning of a meal and a substantial meal, like lunch or dinner would be best. “Some people report taking it with orange juice, but I do not think oil and seafood typically pair nicely together with OJ!” She adds that “we do not recommend freezing or refrigerating the capsules because that will prolong the rupture time of the softgel. If the softgel does not rupture soon after being swallowed that is less time for your body to absorb the nutrients within each softgel.

For more information and resources for omega-3s, check out Trident’s brand, Pure Alaska Omega and also the website for the Global Organization for EPA and DHA Omega-3s or GOED.

For more information on eating well in your 50s, 60s, 70s, and beyond, check out Food & Fitness After 50.

Disclosure: I was a guest of Trident Seafoods, Women of Seafood, to learn more about wild Alaska fishing. However, I was not asked to write this post or compensated to do so.

Copyright © 2019 [Christine Rosenbloom]. All Rights Reserved.

 

 

Food & Fitness After 50: Good Food for your Valentine

Tomorrow we think of affairs of the heart: flowers, cupid, and chocolate all come to mind. But, this year, treat your special someone to something really good for their heart and brain…seafood and fish. OK, not the most romantic or sexy of foods, but fish and seafood provide needed fats for healthy hearts and brains.

Fish and seafood contain high quality protein (here is an older post on protein for those over 50.)

But today we are focusing healthy fats. For that, fish can’t be beat. A quick look at the alphabet soup of healthy fats:

Fish oil pillsOmega-3s: These are the chemical class of healthy fats; if you want to impress your friends tell them the name omega-3s comes how the fat molecule is structured; the omega end of the chemical fat chain and the first double bond, 3 carbons in…hence, “omega-3s.”

EPA and DHA are 2 types of omega-3s that help to keep our blood vessels healthy (a healthy blood vessel dilates and contracts to control blood pressure and move blood throughout the body; a stiff blood vessel is not a healthy one), helps to lower a blood fat called triglycerides, and helps brains cells communicating (fat makes up a large part of our brain). DHA is especially important in brain health. Dr. Tom Brenna, of the Dell Pediatric Research Institute at the University of Texas at Austin puts it this way, “as calcium is to the bones, DHA is to the brain.”

ALA is another type of healthy omega-3 found in plant foods like walnuts, chia seeds, and flax. While we need this type of fat, too, only a small amount of it is converted to EPA and DHA, so it isn’t a substitute for fish, seafood, or fish oil supplements.

Health organizations recommend that we eat fish or seafood twice a week (4-ounce portions) to get the needed 250-500 milligrams of EPA and DHA. Not all fish is created equal when it comes to the healthy fats: fatty fish like salmon, trout, anchovies, mackerel, and sardines have the highest levels, with milder fish like cod, haddock, mahi mahi, and tilapia containing lower levels. However, don’t let that discourage your from eating tilapia or mahi mahi, but consider adding some sea bass or tuna in the mix to boost EPA and DHA intake. For great information on everything you want to know about fish…from omega-3 containing fish and seafood to choosing and preparing fish, check out the Seafood Nutrition Partnership.

A couple of other things to consider:
• Frozen or canned fish is not inferior; it is kind to your wallet and is a good way to eat fish if you can’t find fresh seafood in your local market. I use frozen fish to grill and blacken for tasty fish tacos and frozen shrimp for Pad Thai or a stir-fry.
• Grill it, broil it, bake it, steam it, or poach it to keep the omega-3s from losing their potency. The high heat of frying can break down the omega-3s, so save that cooking method for the occasional fish fry.
fish oil• If you just don’t like fish or have a family member who won’t touch it, consider fish oil supplements. Look at the nutrition facts panel to make sure you are getting EPA and DHA in the 250-500 milligram range. On this label you see value of a 1000 milligrams, but not all of that fish oil is EPA and DHA; you’ve got to look at the actual amount of EPA and DHA in the supplement.
• For vegetarians, consider an algae-based omega-3 supplement.

Take this quiz from the Global Organization on EPA and DHA Omegas.

And, happy Valentine’s Day!  More tips on food and fitness after 50 can be found in our book, available on Amazon.