Food & Fitness After 50: Lean Pork for the Protein Win

(Disclosure: The National Pork Board sent me a meal kit to try a lean pork dish. However, they did not ask me to write this post and I was not compensated to do so. As with everything I write, these are my opinions.)

We often talk about the importance of getting adequate protein as we age. In a recent post, we talked to three protein experts and the consensus is that older adults should aim to:

  • eat nutrient-rich sources of high-quality protein at every meal
  • ensure adequate protein to repair and replace proteins in the body
  • choose meats, fish, eggs, and dairy foods for highest quality protein (while vegetable proteins are popular, they are lower quality than animal proteins)
  • spread protein foods throughout the day.

One way to accomplish these goals is by choosing lean meats, like pork loin. Pork is a versatile meat that checks all the points listed above. It is no surprise that pork makes an appearance on many global tables. From soul food to Hispanic dishes, to summer grilling and holiday meals, pork is often the centerpiece.

Choose nutrient-rich protein

Pork is a nutrient-rich meat of high quality, meaning it contains all the essential amino acids needed for muscle repair and maintenance. It is recommended that older adults get about 30 grams of protein per meal…sounds like a lot, but easy when lean meat is part of the diet. A 3-ounce serving of lean pork has 24 grams of protein. Check out the serving sizes of other proteins that you would need to eat to equal 24 grams of protein.

Pork is also a rich source of vitamins and minerals needed for healthy aging: vitamins B1, 2, 3 (also called thiamin, riboflavin, and niacin), vitamins B6 and B12, and the mineral selenium. And while there are fattier cuts of pork (hello, bacon), there are 8 cuts of pork that are lean by the USDA definition (less than 10 grams of total fat, less than 4.5 grams of saturated fat, and 95 milligrams of cholesterol per serving). Pork tenderloin and pork sirloin roast are leaner still. An easy way to remember to choose lean cuts of pork is to look for the word loin or chop in the name.

Even for those who are eating a plant-forward diet, animal foods do not have to be eliminated. Using small servings of meat can enhance the protein in a meal while still including lots of veggies, fruit, and grains.  You can see from my plate, that meat takes only a portion of the plate while veggies cover more than 2/3rd.

Safety First

Folks of my generation were afraid that under-cooking pork would give them a food-borne illness, so we overcompensated by overcooking. Overdone, leathery pork is not good! But, with current pig farming practices and safety inspections, we know that cooking pork to the proper internal temperature of 145⁰F (ground pork should be cooked to 160⁰F) eliminates any risk for food-borne illness. After it reaches the correct temperature, remove from the heat and let it rest for 3 minutes to preserve the juices. I always use a meat thermometer to ensure I don’t OVERCOOK the meat.

Setting the Record Straight

There are some other concerns people have about pork, or more specifically raising pigs. I reached out to registered dietitian, owner of Farm to Form Communications, and 5th generation South Dakota pig farmer, Charlotte Rommereim, to set the record straight on a few persistent myths.

Myth #1: All pigs are raised by “big ag” who care little for animal welfare.

“There are over 67,000 pig farms in the United States today.  Those pig farmers raise pigs in a variety of different ways based on their area, their farm’s history, and available resources and labor.  No matter the size of the farm, type of housing or pig farming practices, good animal care remains important to all pig farmers.  Through the over 100 years of pig farming on our family farm, we have changed the type of housing used, and I have seen good animal care practiced no matter whether they were housed in small huts like my grandfather had or indoors in the barns we built in 2005 and 2018,” says Rommereim .”

Myth #2: Raising pigs is bad for the environment.

“Pig farmers are continually improving their practices and have reduced their environmental impact over the last 50 years while continuing to have the best in animal care.  Research at the University of Arkansas showed a 75.9% reduction in land use, 25.1% less water, 7% less energy use, and 7.7% fewer carbon emissions from 1965-2015.”

Myth #3: Pork is full of hormones.

“NO, I repeat NO, hormones are used in raising pigs,” reports Rommereim. “Growth hormones are prohibited in raising pork or poultry. There is no advantage to the pork product labeled “no hormones added” as this is true for all pork so please don’t spend any extra money to have that on your label.”

I also asked Charlotte what she thinks about including pork in the diet for an older adult. Her reply echoes what was said earlier in the post. “Pork is an economical, versatile, and lean, nutritious protein choice for the older adult.  It can bring the familiar with a pork chop dinner or be the protein choice for a new taste experience.  Pork is the most popular protein in the world so you can take the opportunity during the pandemic to “travel the globe” by trying new pork recipes.  Pork pairs well with other food groups making it easy to have a healthy plate, for example pork stir fry with vegetables, or grilled peaches with pork tenderloin.” For another Powerful Pairing with pork, consider pulses, also called dried beans and peas. Pulses are unique and are counted as both a vegetable and a protein-rich food. The link to the Powerful Pairing website contains some great recipes, so give them a try.

Rommereim adds, “As a dietitian, I recommend the 8 great cuts of pork that meet the USDA criteria for lean including my favorite pork tenderloin.” She also stressed cooking to the proper temperature of 145⁰F for “tender, tasty, and safe pork.”

Her favorite recipe? “There are many on this website”and Charlotte adds, “I enjoy pork tenderloin a variety of ways, from a grilling with a simple dry rub of spices to stir frying with vegetables after a quick marinade.  I can get a nutritious meal on the table in a short amount of time. Like many, I struggle with meal planning and this fits my more spur of the moment decisions for a healthy meal.  When I have more time, my favorite recipe is one our family enjoys featuring pork tenderloin and our favorite summer fruit, peaches.”

Grilled Peaches and Pork

One- approximately 1-pound pork tenderloin

1/4 cup balsamic vinegar, divided

2 Tablespoons fresh lime juice

3 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

4 large peaches, peeled, halved and pitted

4 cups salad greens

1 teaspoon turbinado or granulated sugar

Combine 2 Tablespoons vinegar, juice, thyme, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Reserve 1 Tablespoon juice mixture. Pour the remaining juice mixture in a large zip-top plastic bag. Add pork, seal and marinate in the refrigerator for 1/2 to 1 hour, turning occasionally.

Place peaches, cut sides up on a plate, drizzle with remaining 2 Tablespoons vinegar.

Place pork on grill; grilling on each side, cooking until pork reaches an internal temperature of 145 degrees. Set aside to rest.

Place peaches cut sides down, on grill; grill 4 minutes or until soft and slightly browned.  Turn and cook for 2 minutes or until heated through. Cut each half into 4 slices.  Cut slices of pork for serving.

Drizzle salad greens with reserved 1 Tablespoon juice mixture, tossing to coat. Divide salad greens evenly among 4 plates. Top with grilled pork tenderloin slices and peach slices; sprinkle evenly with turbinado sugar.

Yield: 4 servings

And, here is the recipe in the video that was sent courtesy of The National Pork Board.

Cherry Balsamic Pork Chops (Recipe from HelloFresh)

2 6-ounce center cut pork chops

1 small shallot, chopped

5 teaspoons balsamic vinegar

2 Tablespoons cherry jam

1/3 cup water

½ teaspoon sugar

1 Tablespoon butter

Salt and pepper

Pat pork dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. Heat a drizzle of olive oil in large pan over medium-high heat. Add pork and cook until browned, about 4-6 minutes per side. Use meat thermometer to measure temperature and when it reaches 145⁰F, remove pork chops from pan and set aside.

In the same pan used to cook pork, add another drizzle of olive oil over medium heat. Add shallot; cook, stirring, until lightly browned, about 4-5 minutes. Add vinegar; simmer until slightly reduced, 30-60 seconds. Add jam and 1/3 cup water. Cook until thickened, 3-5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper, and up to ½ teaspoon sugar to taste. Turn off heat. Stir in butter until melted. Return pork to pan; turn to coat in sauce.

Yield: 2 servings

Dr. Christine Rosenbloom is a registered dietitian nutritionist and a nutrition professor emerita at Georgia State University in Atlanta. Along with Dr. Bob Murray, she is the author of Food & Fitness After 50.

Copyright © 2019 [Christine Rosenbloom]. All Rights Reserved

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Food & Fitness After 50: The Menopause Diet Plan

I am often asked what diet plan is best for managing the short and long-term symptoms of menopause. So, I was excited when two of the best in the profession, both personal friends and colleagues, authored a new book, The Menopause Diet Plan, A Natural Guide to Managing Hormones, Health and Happiness available TODAY, September 8! I preordered my copy as soon as I heard about the book, but I reached out to the authors to answer some of your questions about menopause.

First, meet the authors. Elizabeth (Liz) Ward and I met years ago through volunteer work for our professional association, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Liz writes an awesome blog, Better Is the New Perfect (there is a link on her website to sign up and receive an email when she publishes a post) and a top-notch recipe developer. She is the author of Expect the Best: Your Guide to Healthy Eating Before, During, and After Pregnancy and is a mom of three daughters.

Liz introduced me to one of her best friends, Hillary Wright, who is a mom of three sons. Hillary is the Director for Nutrition Counseling for the Domar Center for Mind Body Health in Waltham, Massachusetts and she has a part time position as a Senior Nutritionist at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. Hillary has written two books, The PCOS Diet Plan: A Natural Approach to Health for Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and and The Prediabetes Diet Plan: How to Reverse Prediabetes and Prevent Diabetes through Healthy Eating and Exercise. They teamed up to write The Menopause Diet Plan.

 Question: You’ve been friends for a long time, and you have authored other nutrition books. What made you decide to collaborate on this book and on this topic?

 Ward starts the conversation: “We met in college and became friends, and we went to the same school for our graduate degrees. We share a lot in common on our outlook on women’s health. At this point in our lives and as we experienced perimenopause and menopause, it just seemed like the right time to work together.  We both feel strongly about the importance of midlife nutrition and other beneficial lifestyle habits for women as they reach their 50s and beyond.”

Wright agrees: “As registered dietitians with expertise in women’s health – and good friends since college — Liz and I have often batted around ideas on how we might collaborate.  When as we entered menopause it triggered many conversations about what we were experiencing, including what was “normal.”  In the process of trying to educate ourselves we found that resources for this life phase were sorely lacking, and realized we’d finally landed on our collaboration idea.  And it was a personal as well as professional decision.”

Question: Menopause has been medicalized as a disease therefore women seek treatment and often find lots of “cures.” How did you approach the topic of menopause and what one piece of advice would you give to women as they approach menopause?

“Menopause is often referred to as a “transition” for a reason, and the transition begins earlier than many women think,” says Wright. “Hormone fluctuations and accompanying symptoms roll out over a period of years, generally starting in the mid-40’s, so this is a great time to start talking to your health care providers about what is “normal,” and what to be on the lookout for.  For example, one of the biggest concerns for women as they approach midlife is weight gain. Research shows most women start accruing a little extra fat starting in their 40’s, related to body composition changes and hormone shifts through the perimenopause years. This is the best time to pay attention to your eating and exercise habits to help curb the weight creep and decrease in fitness.”

Ward agrees. “There is no “cure” for menopause, but there are ways that women can help themselves feel better during perimenopause and after menopause occurs.  My advice is to start talking openly about symptoms – to friends, to health care professionals, and to family – so that they better understand what is happening and what can be done to reduce symptoms such as hot flashes, mood swings, and weight gain. Think of the menopause transition as an opportunity to get educated about what’s happening in the body and how good nutrition, regular exercise, stress reduction and other lifestyle habits can help you feel your best.”

Question: There are real body composition changes that occur during menopause…how do you balance that fact with helping women who are fearful of gaining weight as they age?

Ward has empathy for women going through changes, and she reveals that she gained 10 pounds during perimenopause.” I don’t think any woman escapes some weight gain with the run up to menopause and in her later years. I understand the fear that a woman might have, but armed with the facts, it’s easier to understand why weight gain and body composition changes happen, and how to keep weight gain to a minimum. Weight control during midlife and beyond is not about taking drastic measures; it’s about learning how to eat better in a way that’s right for you. Focus on eating for health, not for the scale.”

“Hopefully, with age comes the wisdom that we can’t micromanage everything about our body,” adds Wright.  “Weight gain around menopause is not solely related to declining estrogen; there are many other factors that affect body composition around midlife, some of which are controllable. Women often face many stresses and it is impossible to avoid the stress of demanding jobs, caring for kids still living at home, or the caregiving needs of aging parents, but we can decide take time out to eat healthfully, trade in some Netflix time for physical activity, or seek support around the things that are the biggest stressors. Some weight creep through these years may be the reality for most women, but prioritizing self-care can go far towards mediating how much weight is gained.”

Question: It seems that women seek relief for the acute effects of menopause (hot flashes, sleep issues) but might ignore the more consequential long-term health problems (increased heart disease risk, bone health, cognitive health). Can you give me the top line nutrition plan that will help with both short-term and long-term health issues?

 “We developed The Menopause Diet Plan to address weight control; protect bone health, brain health, heart health; and to help women feel their best. Our eating plan uses the latest research to address the prevention of type 2 diabetes, some cancers, and more. It’s a plant-based (but not animal-free) way of eating that includes the nutrients you need to help prevent and manage long-term health issues,” says Ward. “In doing our research we were happy to learn that the same plant-based diet and lifestyle strategies that lower risk of many chronic diseases may also help manage menopausal symptoms,” adds Wright. “Studies show that, along with regular physical activity, eating more fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, seeds and legumes, and limiting added sugars, alcohol, ultra-processed foods, and many animal foods, may improve sleep, curb hot flashes, and increase energy levels.”

Both Ward and Wright recognize that there are women who eat well and stay active yet still have hot flashes or suffer too many miserable sleepless nights. “But aiming for a diet that is high in fiber, encourages more plant-based proteins and healthy fats, and is loaded with disease -fighting anti-inflammatories and anti-oxidants checks many boxes for avoiding long term health problems like heart disease and diabetes.” Another advantage of a plant-based diet is that high fiber foods are more filling which can curb the appetite and control excess calorie intake. “Our plan makes plant-based eating easy by offering simple suggestions to promote balance at meals, while also encouraging women to budget in small portions of their “foods for fun” so they don’t feel like they’re “dieting,” says Wright.

Question: Tell me about the recipes in the book…and thanks for sharing the recipe for Lazy Lentil Soup (I can attest is delicious!)

Ward, known as a creative recipe developer, says, “Recipes reinforce the concepts in The Menopause Diet Plan and they show readers how they can easily enjoy delicious and nutritious foods.  The recipes are healthful…low in saturated fat, rich in plant foods, and free of added sugar. They are practical, everyday recipes that women can make for themselves and for their families because they are healthy and delicious.” Wright and Ward developed all of the recipes for the book and Wright adds they also include some family favorites that have passed the test with their husbands and kids.

Question: What do you do to eat well, move well, and be well?

Wright makes exercise a daily priority with outdoor activity her favorite (despite living in a cold Massachusetts climate). “Cycling and walking are my go-to activities and I also take strength training classes and yoga at a local gym.” She adds, I grew up in a house with two siblings with Type 1 diabetes so I fully attribute my healthy, plant-based eating habits to my mother who made it happen at the dinner table every night, and my mom and grandparents who taught me how to cook at a young age.  It takes a village!”

Ward says she used to focus on aerobic exercise but has started to do more weight training to preserve muscle mass. “I work out 6 times a week, walk the dog every day, and generally try to stay active as much as possible. As for eating, I follow the principles in The Menopause Diet Plan – lots of plants, whole foods, and seafood. I also eat a treat (usually chocolate) every day. I don’t weigh what I did when I was 25, but I’m healthy and I’ll take it!”

The Menopause Diet Plan gets a 5-star rating in my book! I always enjoy books written by qualified health professionals based on science, not speculation. And, with 25 recipes and resources for more information, it is a woman’s guide to good health.

Lazy Lentil Soup

Makes 4 servings.

Lentils double as a vegetable and protein source, and using the canned kind gets this soup on the table in about 20 minutes. (Hint: make a double batch and freeze half!). Pair with yogurt and fruit for a complete meal.

2 tablespoons olive or canola oil

1 medium yellow onion, chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced

2 large carrots, peeled and cut into ¼-inch pieces

½ teaspoon dried thyme

1 cup cooked lentils, canned or fresh

1 15-ounce can no added salt fire-roasted tomatoes, not drained

1 ½ cups reduced-sodium chicken or vegetable broth

2 cups, packed, raw baby spinach

½ teaspoon salt

Fresh ground black pepper to taste

In a large skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat. Add onion, garlic, and carrots, and saute for about 5 minutes. Add the thyme and continue to cook until the carrots are fork-tender.

Add the lentils and broth and cook, covered, for about 10 minutes over medium heat.  Add the spinach, salt, and black pepper. Stir until spinach is wilted. Serve warm.

 

Dr. Christine Rosenbloom is a registered dietitian nutritionist and a nutrition professor emerita at Georgia State University in Atlanta. Along with Dr. Bob Murray, she is the author of Food & Fitness After 50.

Copyright © 2019 [Christine Rosenbloom]. All Rights Reserved

 

Food & Fitness After 50: Coffee with Ted Kyle of ConscienHealth

Meeting Ted in Budapest

I have coffee every morning with Ted Kyle, founder of ConscienHealth. Not literally, but his thoughtful commentary arrives in my email box every morning and I read it as I sip my morning coffee. Seven days a week, Ted produces an insightful commentary on issues surrounding obesity. His goal is to provide sound science to health professionals and consumers to foster solutions to obesity prevention, care, and research. He started ConscienHealth in 2009 and his influential work now reaches more than 20,000 readers around the world.

I’ve admired Ted for his passion, dedication, and commitment to contributing to solving complex problems. After hearing him speak at a conference earlier this year, I examined some my biases about obesity and wrote about it for this blog (click here for the post). It is one of my most shared posts so it must resonate with many people. I wanted to learn more about Ted’s journey to becoming a tireless advocate for obesity and health and gain some personal insights into how he eats well, moves well, and stays well.

Question: I know you as a respected obesity expert and founder of ConscienHealth. Before that you were a registered pharmacist and then worked in the pharmaceutical industry. How did you start on that path and how did you end up developing ConscienHealth?

Ted explained, “in high school I had a part-time job in my hometown pharmacy, and I enjoyed both the science of pharmacy and the interactions with a variety of customers. I also enjoyed creative pursuits, like photography, but a degree in pharmacy seemed a viable profession to earn a living and to help people along the way.” He pursued a 5-year program in pharmacy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and found time to take some courses to feed his creative side. Journalism and photography classes led him to writing and editing college publications and he landed an internship at Eli Lily in marketing. “My internship combined my love of science with communications and as soon as I graduated with my degree in pharmacy, I decided an MBA would help further my career.”

He landed his first job with a large health care company doing market research. “It allowed me learn about new product development and introduced me some giants in medicine.” One of those giants was Trudy Elion , a pioneering female scientist who developed breakthrough drugs for leukemia, for organ transplant rejection, and for viral infections. Elion earned the Nobel Prize for her work in drug development in 1988.

As his career continued, Ted ended up in Pittsburgh, working on drug development as well as rapid, convenient testing for HIV. One of the drugs he worked on was Orlistat, a medicine to augment diet and lifestyle changes for obesity. It was at that time that his passion for empowering people living with obesity was born. “I interviewed hundreds of people living with obesity and learned a lot about the stigma and bias they face. Through a lifetime of living with a chronic disease, one that involved both biology and behavior, all they ever heard was it was all their fault. I met people who were deeply grateful to have someone listen to them and try to understand their experiences. Hearing the stories of the burdens people face was a deeply moving experience.” Around this time, public health experts recognized what came to be called an obesity epidemic, but Ted found that “the public talked of concern about obesity but mostly just blamed the people affected. Well-intended public health messages were actually counterproductive, and it was then I decided to do something different.”

Question: How did you grow ConscienHealth into the “go to” place for experts around the world?

“It started slow, but I knew that an online presence was needed. Initially, I designed a rather crude website, but then hired a pro to design a simple, easy to navigate website to house our content. I work with a group of people committed to a scientific approach to improve our understanding of obesity and to breaking through the weight bias that exists in us all. I came to understand the science, not just the physiology, but also the behavioral and psychological aspect of living with obesity. Stigma is real and it makes health outcomes worse.”

“Recently, I’ve been writing more about the effects of obesity on COVID-19 outcomes. A European colleague in Italy reached out to me and said there was something going on with obesity and poorer outcomes in those who were infected with the virus. So, I did a lot of digging as more and more compelling data emerged. I have been able to participate in an exchange of knowledge about the interaction between obesity and COVID-19. It’s been quite a journey.” (Click here to read Ted’s post from March of this year.)

Question: Shifting gears here, but you care for many others, what do you do to care for yourself? You are now in your 60s, how do you stay well? How do you eat well, move well, and be well?

“I credit my wife for her smart approach to eating well. We eat what we think is a healthful diet. I have oatmeal and fruit at breakfast, big salads loaded with all kinds of summer veggies, and grilled protein foods for dinner. During the pandemic, grilling fish has become more of a mainstay for us.

For activity, we walk every day. I used to log between 6,000 to 10,000 steps a day but during the pandemic I’ve almost doubled that to 12,000 to 18,000 steps. I love being outdoors so walking and biking are my favorite ways to keep moving.”

As for staying well, Ted has his family, friends, and colleagues for social support, but he admits his biggest challenge is sleep, or lack of it. “There is just so much to do that I find it hard to get 8 hours of sleep. I get up about 3 am each day so I can write my commentary for ConscienHealth to get it online by 6 am.” (And, just in time for my morning coffee!)

Question: What 3 tips or advice would you give to others to eat well, move well, and be well?

“The first is to stay curious about everything. Whether it is people, nutrition, health….just stay curious.. Second, be objective about what is known. For me, the essence of communication about science requires sophisticated and ethical messages that are engaging and approachable. This is what I try to do every day with my commentary. The third piece of advice is to care for the needs of the others around you.”

I think we can all agree with his good advice! And, if you are not following ConscienHealth…do so!

Dr. Christine Rosenbloom is a registered dietitian nutritionist and a nutrition professor emerita at Georgia State University in Atlanta. Along with Dr. Bob Murray, she is the author of Food & Fitness After 50.

Copyright © 2019 [Christine Rosenbloom]. All Rights Reserved