Food & Fitness After 50: Can we Sustain Cooking at Home after the Pandemic?

They say that with age comes wisdom. It seems that wisdom extends to the eating habits of those of us over 50. Ninety-five percent of adults over the age of 50 agree that fruits and vegetables have many health benefits and 89% say they enjoy eating them. Older adults are also more likely to recognize the short and long term health benefits of eating fruits and vegetables compared to younger age groups who eat them because they were told they were good for them or someone else prepared them.

A health strategy that dietitians embrace as a way to eat more fruits and veggies is diet1cooking at home and 2020 saw a big spike in home cooking. According to a recent research report, “Home Cooking in America 2020” from The Food Industry Association (FMI) 40% of American adults say they are cooking more since the pandemic. That might be the silver lining for these challenging and uncertain times. Like many of you I like watching “House Hunters” and I always get a kick out the couple whose wish list includes a gourmet kitchen even though neither one of them cooks! And, many love cooking shows yet they rely on take out for their meals. Of course, the resurgence in home cooking is forced upon us by stay at home orders, closure of our favorite restaurants, or feeling unsafe venturing out to eat, but it is getting us in the kitchen.

How can we encourage the cooking trend to continue once the pandemic is over? After reading the “Home Cooking in America 2020” report, several clues are revealed by the research. Here the highlights that apply to the 50+ demographic, and some personal tips to encourage the cooking trends.

iStock-Couple in kitchen 2“Shared cooking supports consistent cooking.” Those who say they cook a lot often have some help in the kitchen. The report suggests that retired adults may have more time and a renewed interest in cooking with their partner or family as a form of togetherness. While women still are the primary shoppers and chefs, now is a great time to get your partner in the kitchen.

Personal Tip:  I encourage my husband to cook by agreeing to be his sous chef; I get the ingredients ready, chop veggies, measure the spices or herbs, set out the pans or pots, and then offer help when needed. Turns out he is an inventive cook and more creative than I am in the kitchen. He also makes a mean weekend breakfast!

Bagels
Making bagels!

Bonus Tip: Now is a great time to pass along family recipes or favorite kitchen hacks to the next generation. Inspired by a neighbor, click here to access the post highlighting her ideas on paying it forward. But it is also a great time for the older generation to learn from the younger. My niece, Samantha, taught me how to make bagels and I’ve been perfecting my technique since her original bagel making lesson. My nephew, Reis, is also handy in the kitchen. On his visit he taught me how to make an easy, crusty French Bread. It was fun to watch him bake and I reaped triple rewards: spending time with my college-aged nephew, learning a new baking technique, and eating delicious bread.

“Cooking well is a path to eating well.” Tastes rules when it comes to choosing foods and cooking can be a path forward to both taste and health. It’s never been easier to find recipes that contain less calories, saturated fat, sodium, or sugar. And cooking is great way to incorporate more fruits and veggies into meals. Many of us are dusting off small kitchen appliances and rediscovering why we bought them in the first place…. from slow cookers (one of my faves) to Instant pots, we’re enjoying new cooking methods.

Personal Tip: I’ve written about my early pandemic purchase of an Air Fryer and I can’t believe it took a world-wide virus for me to fall in love with it. I use it all the time to turn indulgent foods (fried shrimp!) into healthier versions. It is a quick way to roast veggies, too. Cauliflower, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts cook up crisp and flavorful in an air fryer. Plus, it doesn’t heat up the kitchen and it is easy to clean. I’ve turned several friends on to the virtues of air frying and we swap favorite recipes each time we talk.

Picture1“Sticking to budgets and reducing food waste has never been more important.” Fifty-one percent of consumers expect they will be better in the future about not letting food go to waste. With food costs on the rise and wanting to minimize shopping trips, getting creative with leftovers (or, as my friend calls them, “plan-overs”) means less waste.

Personal Tip: With late summer harvest fruits and veggies appearing at farmer’s markets, roadside stands, community gardens, and your local grocery store, make sure to use it all up to avoid waste and save money. My lake neighbor has an incredible garden and when he comes to his lake home, he brings bags and buckets of tomatoes, peppers, yellow squash, and zucchini. I’ve made salsa with the tomatoes and peppers, grilled squash kabobs, whipped up chopped tomato caprese salad (adding in my home-grown basil), and make easy stir-fries with leftover chicken and veggies.

“Scratch cooking can be fluid.” Many of us have an idealized version of scratch cooking. You don’t have to make your tomato sauce or fresh pasta to enjoy “scratch” home-cooked meals.

Personal Tip: Convenience items offer short cuts that can make cooking easier and less daunting. I can’t live without canned beans…black beans, kidney beans, chickpeas…are versatile, nutritious, and easy. Just open the can, drain and rinse, and they are ready for soups, stews, or salad. For those nights when you don’t want to cook, don’t overlook a frozen lasagna for dinner and add a big green salad and some crusty bread for a quick meal.

tgn_080918_nfmm_consumer_infographics_-9-outline_002Krystal Register, registered dietitian who leads the health and well-being initiatives for FMI, the food industry association, agrees that “now is the perfect time to embrace the many benefits we can all experience from home cooking and shared family meals. Research from the FMI Foundation, along with many other studies, shows that more frequent family meals are associated with better dietary outcomes and family functioning outcomes. Consumers are to be commended for adapting and discovering new skills and perspectives while cooking more at home. We encourage families to stay strong with family meals. While there are plenty of inspirational ideas, we hope that families stay connected by cooking at home and eating meals together, building habits that can lead to healthier eating patterns and improved overall well-being.”

Dr. Christine Rosenbloom is a registered dietitian nutritionist and a nutrition professor emerita at Georgia State University in Atlanta. Along with Dr. Bob Murray, she is the author of Food & Fitness After 50.

Copyright © 2019 [Christine Rosenbloom]. All Rights Reserved

Food & Fitness After 50: Dietary Supplement Q&A

frequently-asked-questions

In June of this year I developed a webinar for Today’s Dietitian titled, “Dietary Supplement Use in Older Adults: Help, Hype, or Hope?” (Click here to access the webinar.) The webinar ended with a robust Q&A. Time ran out before we could get to all of the questions and some of them were tough to answer. In my teaching days I told students to seek out experts when they didn’t know the answer to a question, so I turned to an expert in dietary supplements to help me. Dr. Anthony Thomas is the Director of Scientific Affairs for Jarrow Formulas and he jumped in to answer your questions. I’ve tapped Dr. Thomas in the past when you asked about probiotic supplements…click here for a link to that post.

Question: The number 1 question involved supplement ingredients. Many people believe that all supplement ingredients are manufactured in China and they expressed concerns over quality issues with Chinese ingredients.

“Ingredients for use in dietary supplement manufacturing are sourced from all over the world, including China,” explains Dr. Thomas. “Quality ingredients are quality ingredients regardless of their country of origin and in fact a number of companies headquartered in other countries have manufacturing set up in the U.S., too.”

thOne suggestion that I routine make when asked about supplements is to look for a quality brand, like Jarrow Formulas (disclosure, I have no connection to Jarrow Formulas, but I do use some of their products because I recognize quality supplements.). A quality brand often uses third-party verification or endorsement. That means that a brand contracts with a third-party certifying agency to test their products. One of the most well-known is USP which stands for United States Pharmacopia. When you see the USP symbol on a supplement it tells you that the supplement:

  • Contains what the ingredient label says it contains and, in the amount, listed
  • Doesn’t contain contaminants
  • Will dissolve or break down in the body and get absorbed into the blood stream in a specific time frame
  • Has been made with good manufacturing processes (GMPs) as outlined by the Food & Drug Administration.

NSF-Certified-for-sport-blue-and-orange-196x300Another well-known third-party entity that evaluates supplements is NSF. The NSF certification also helps consumers know they are getting a quality supplement.  When I worked with athletes at the university, we looked for NSF certified supplements because they test supplements to ensure that they do not contain substances banned by their sport governing body.

Question: What is the difference between a supplement called a nutraceutical vs. nootropic?

Dr. Thomas defines it this way, “a supplement called a nutraceutical is more-or-less a fancy term (not a legal term) for dietary components or dietary supplement ingredients with purported health benefits beyond nutritive value.  Nootropics are a subset of ingredients that positively influence cognitive function(s).”

Question: Is there a B12 supplement source for vegans? What form of B12 is best absorbed in older adults?

Vitamin-B12“All forms of B12 used in dietary supplements are suitable for vegans since they are synthesized chemically. Look for one that says suitable for vegans because some capsules are made with gelatin. Jarrow Formulas makes a chewable form that is appropriate for vegans,” says Dr. Thomas. “Thus, the concern about vitamin B12 deficiency in vegans is easily overcome.”

As for the “best” form of B12, Dr. Thomas explains, “despite the marketing hype, there is not good evidence of differences in absorption between different forms of the vitamin. There is limited evidence suggests that methyl-B12 may be better retained by the body and reduced elimination in the urine compared to cyanocobalamin.  Methyl-B12 seems to be the preferred form by consumers, but that is likely due in large part to marketing rather than research demonstrated superiority. Some suggest that methyl-B12 is not suitable for all the body’s needs as if it cannot be converted to right form, but this is incorrect.” The bottom line is that some marketing might make it appear that there is a “best” form but all forms are used by the body.

 Question: How do you know if supplements of omega 3s are not rancid?

Fish-Oil“Unfortunately, smell is not always indicative of oxidative degradation.  If the product is stored away from heat and light exposure, it should be fine, although I often just keep my bottles in the fridge,” says Dr. Thomas. “Soft gels are usually formulated with antioxidant ingredients to protect against oxidation.”  As with other supplements, buy supplements from a reputable brand with a long-standing reputation of quality. That is my recommendation, as well as Dr. Thomas’ recommendation. He adds, “of course this recommendation may seem self-serving given the company I work for.  However, there is increasingly more direct consumer brands primarily available online as they can contract the manufacturing of the supplement and just put their label on the product but it may or may not have all the other quality control measures in place to ensure safety, potency, and quality.  We see more problems with products from such companies, not all or most, and it is often guilt by association for the entire industry. In fact, Jarrow L. Rogovin, the man who started Jarrow Formulas in 1977, relied on contract manufacturers but after so many issues over the years, he eventually invested in the development of our own manufacturing nearly 20 years ago.

Thanks to Dr. Thomas for helping me answer your questions on dietary supplements. Keep the questions coming!

Dr. Christine Rosenbloom is a registered dietitian nutritionist and a nutrition professor emerita at Georgia State University in Atlanta. Along with Dr. Bob Murray, she is the author of Food & Fitness After 50.

Copyright © 2019 [Christine Rosenbloom]. All Rights Reserved

 

 

Food & Fitness After 50: Celebrate the Sandwich During National Sandwich Month

earlofsandwichmythorfactDid you know that August is National Sandwich Month? The sandwich was popularized in the 1700s by  4th Earl of Sandwich, (Sandwich is a medieval town in southeast England in the county of Kent.) The legend goes that the Earl asked for a hunk of beef between two slices of bread so he could hold the meal in one hand while he played cards. One of his companions is to have said, “I’ll have the same as Sandwich,” and thus the humble and delicious sandwich was born.

how-to-buy-healthy-breadWhat makes a truly great sandwich? The overwhelming response to that question is bread, with 42% of people saying the bread is most important ingredient in a sandwich.

Many folks give up bread thinking that it has too many calories or carbs. In a 2017 study, researchers found that all grain foods, including breads, contributed less than 15% of all calories in the total diet, while delivering nutrients that are in short supply in the diet of many Americans, as well as nutrients needed for healthy aging, including dietary fiber, folate, iron, calcium, magnesium, and vitamin A. (Papanikolaou Y & Fulgoni VL. Grain foods are meaningful contributors of nutrient density of American adults and help close nutrient recommendation gaps: Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009-2012. Nutrients. 2017: Aug 14;9(8). 

And, in this time of coronavirus, we are turning to comfort foods and that includes bread. In a national survey, approximately one-third of Americans named pasta (36%) and bread (29%) as foods that are comforting during a stressful time. Of all the comfort foods that Americans turn to in times of stress, they recognize bread and pasta among the most nutritious.

120405183406-stacked-sandwich-super-169I like to think of bread and other grains as the perfect vehicle for carrying protein-rich foods. Sandwiches, wraps, pita pockets, and crackers can carry needed protein, vegetables and healthy fats. Specifically, whole grains also provide antioxidant and anti-inflammatory nutrients. While research is still emerging and further research is needed, a variety of plant-based compounds in whole grains may impact oxidative stress, suggesting that reducing oxidative stress by consuming whole grains is a likely mechanism for the protective effect from diseases associated with aging.

National Sandwich Month is the perfect time to enjoy a sandwich for dinner. In the dog days of August heat, make a sandwich for dinner and pack with veggies, quality protein fillings, and healthy fats for a tasty meal. It is the ingredients between the slices of bread that should be the focus of delivering a healthier sandwich. With so many delicious breads to select from, choose your favorite and be mindful of the filling. Know your stuff before you cut, and modify the sandwich filling, not the best part…the bread!

Here are some sandwich ideas to get you started and I’d love to hear your favorite sandwich, too! All these sandwiches go great with a side of fresh summer fruit, such as berries, melon, or peaches.

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  • Sliced tomato and avocado sandwich with lettuce on toasted whole wheat bread
  • Grilled turkey burger topped with grilled onions and peppers on a toasted brioche bun
  • Roasted veggies (artichokes, peppers, mushrooms) tucked into a pita pocket
  • Deli turkey meat with Swiss cheese and Russian dressing on hearty rye bread
  • Tuna salad with sliced olives, lettuce, and tomato on sour dough bread
  • Cold slices of chicken wrapped into a tortilla and topped with salsa
  • Grilled lean beef burger with sliced cucumber, red onion, and tomato served in a pita pocket with tzatziki sauce for a Greek-style sandwich
  • Grilled chicken sausage on hot dog bun with sauerkraut
  • Bagel, cream cheese and smoked salmon with capers and red onion slices
  • Cuban sandwich with leftover pork loin, a slice of ham, pickles, and cheese on a toasted baguette
  • Thinly sliced tart apple, cheddar cheese, and chicken panini
  • Egg salad on sweet Hawaiian roll
  • Olive tapenade and goat cheese on grilled French bread
  • Grilled cheese; but change it up using different cheese (spicy Jalapeno Monterey Jack!) on your favorite bread

Dr. Christine Rosenbloom is a registered dietitian nutritionist and a nutrition professor emerita at Georgia State University in Atlanta. Along with Dr. Bob Murray, she is the author of Food & Fitness After 50.

Copyright © 2019 [Christine Rosenbloom]. All Rights Reserved