Food & Fitness After 50: Alaska Adventure, Part 1

I just returned from a week-long adventure in Alaska, thanks to Trident Seafoods “Women of Seafood” program. The goal of the sponsored travel is education, fishing, and fellowship and all three objectives were met with resounding success.

Prior to my trip, I asked you what you wanted to know about seafood and you responded with thoughtful, probing questions. I sorted the questions into three buckets: nutritional benefits of seafood, issues surrounding sustainability of fishing, and clarification on fish oil supplements. I will be following up with all three of these categories in future posts, but today I want to give you a flavor of the trip.

When I tell people I just returned from Alaska, the first thing they ask is “were you on a cruise?” Well, if you count being on trawler in the Bering Sea a cruise, then yes! But, this “cruise” took me to parts of Alaska that the average cruise ship doesn’t go, and most people don’t see.

IMG_5254We started the trip in Seattle, where we did a tour of the famous Pike Place Market, where I was challenged to catch a fish at the Pike Place Fish Market, the only fish I caught that week! We were introduced to two local restaurants, known for their delicious seafood, Staple & Fancy for dinner and Serious Biscuit for breakfast the following morning before heading off to King Salmon airport in Bristol Bay, Alaska.

Upon landing, we toured the Naknek production facility to watch sockeye salmon processing…from fresh fish off the boat to frozen fish, fish meal, and fish oil, all within hours of the catch. Many of us don’t know how our food gets from sea to table and seeing the operation gave me a new appreciation of fisherman and processors. This plant runs 24/7 during salmon season to give us the highest quality fish. After the tour we headed to a lodge on the Naknek River for a wonderful dinner of, you guessed it, salmon.

 

handOne of the questions you asked was about the different types of salmon. An easy way to remember it is to look at your hand.

  • Thumb, rhymes with Chum (also called Keta)
  • The space between your thumb and index finger looks like a sock, so think of Sockeye (also called Red)
  • The middle finger is the largest, so that is for King Salmon (also called Chinook)
  • We wear rings on the ring finger (often silver rings), so think of Silver Salmon (also called Coho)
  • And, of course, the pinkie is for Pink Salmon

The next day we donned waders and took to skiffs to fish for Sockeye; my first experience with fly fishing and it wasn’t easy! Obviously, not easy because I didn’t catch anything. But, only one person in our group caught a Sockeye, so I’m blaming it on the 90-degree heat! I think the fish just wanted to swim in deeper, cooler water since it seems that I brought the Georgia weather with me to Alaska!

IMG_2529In the afternoon we took a float plane to Katmai National Park and hiked the bear trail to Brooks Falls to watch the bears fishing for salmon. They didn’t have any better luck than I did, but it was amazing to see them in action! As we were getting ready to board our float plane, we had a slight delay as a momma bear took her two cubs for a lakeside stroll. No one wants to come between a mom and her cubs!

IMG_2541 (2)

IMG_2555The next day we took a flight to Dutch Harbor, midway down the Aleutian Island chain, and were lucky to find a catcher/processor vessel in the harbor for a tour. These vessels catch the fish and process it all on board before off loading the frozen fish in the harbor. Amazing to tour the boat as the cargo was being delivered to the dock. The number one thing I remember about the tour was how clean it was…. cleaner than my own kitchen! The dedication to food safety (as well as safety of the crew) is remarkable.

IMG_2613After the tour our “cruise” began; we boarded the Fishing Vessel (F/V) Sovereignty, heading out to fish for wild Alaska Pollock, heading to Akutan. If you’ve ever watched Deadliest Catch, you might recognize this view of Akutan, the largest primary fish processing facility in North America. The Pollock were not cooperating as they were further west and north, so we couldn’t drop the net, but we were entertained by a pod of humpback whales (at least 40 of them!) scooping herring into their huge jaws! IMG_2604

Touring the plant, a mini-city, as they processed Pollock at lightning speed was amazing. They also process surimi and fish oil. After a long day (dusk is about 11:30 in Alaska this time of year), we crashed in Akutan. Fog blanketed the island and the only way back to Dutch Harbor was to board the trawler at 5 AM for another 5-hour trip. (There is no airstrip on the island….only a helicopter pad.) The crew was so gracious to the eight women on board; preparing delicious meals for 2 days! I never expected to eat shrimp ceviche on a fishing vessel in the Bering Sea!

Our flight out of Alaska took us to Anacortes, Washington to tour a secondary processing plant. This is where the frozen fish meets battering and breading, depending on what the customer wants. From Costco and Sam’s Club to quick service restaurants to food service in schools and other institutions, you’ve probably had seafood from the Bering Sea!

Our last stop was in Seattle at the Trident Innovation Center where we got a peek, and a taste, of innovative products that will be coming to market in the future. We also heard from the Seafood Nutrition Partnership and the Alaska Seafoods Marketing Institute and many of your questions were answered.

20190712_200138The last night focused all on the fellowship as we relived our adventures and enjoyed the new friendships we made. We dined at the famous Ray’s and were joined by Captain Josh Harris. I never thought I would be learning to crack Alaska King Crab legs with the Deadliest Catch star!

I’m working on new posts to answer all of your questions, so stay tuned! But, for now, eat more seafood, because it does make you smarter and prettier!

Very special thanks to our Trident hosts, amazing Women of Seafood, Ana and Christine!20190712_171253

For more information on eating well, moving well, and being well check out Food & Fitness After 50.

Copyright © 2019 [Christine Rosenbloom]. All Rights Reserved.

 

 

 

Food & Fitness After 50: A Deep Dive into Water Aerobics

If you are looking for a non-impact activity that provides all the components of fitness…cardiovascular, muscle strength and endurance, and flexibility, then water aerobics might be for you. And, bonus points for the cooling water in the pool as a great antidote to summer heat and humidity.

Water Aerobics is not Playing, but it is Fun

Sue Ellen
Suellen leading water aerobics

If you think that those folks in the pool are just playing, think again. “Water aerobics is a full body workout,” says Suellen, who at age 73 teaches classes throughout the summer, sometimes as many as five classes a week. Suellen has been an avid exerciser since the early 1980s when she and her friends donned leotards and did Jazzercise until she found water aerobics. “I’ve had lower back problems since I was a teen and the jarring impact of land-based exercise could make my back issues worse and put me out of commission for over a week,” says Suellen. So, she switched to water-based exercise and liked it so much she became a certified water aerobics instructor. “I never planned to be an instructor, but another instructor encouraged me and a friend to take the YMCA-based training and the rest is history.” The certification “wasn’t easy, but I learned CPR, water fitness, and both classroom and in-the-pool exams made me a competent instructor with more confidence,” says Suellen.

The benefits of water aerobics are many:

  • It promotes gains in muscle strength.“The resistance of the water makes an ideal environment to build muscle and there are many ways to change moves to make them more challenging as strength builds,” notes Suellen.
  • It is beneficial in treating osteoarthritis of knee and hip joints. Many people associate water aerobics with exercise for people with arthritis and for good reason. Your body weight is reduced by about 90% from the buoyancy of the water thereby reducing stress on weight-bearing joints. 
  • It is a welcoming environment for those who have been sedentary, who are overweight, or who have chronic disease. “We have all levels of fitness in a typical water aerobics class from those who are very fit to those who have chronic conditions, like rheumatoid arthritis, who find exercise difficult. Suellen always tells her students, to keep three things in mind during any class when they find movement difficult…slow it down, make smaller moves, and substitute an easier move.”
  • Many people choose water aerobics when rehabbing from an injury or surgery. Cathy, a regular in Suellen’s class, told me she was “looking for an exercise class that she could do after she finished physical therapy for knee replacement surgery. I found water aerobics to be of great benefit in strengthening my knee and I think it helped me get back to land-based aerobics more quickly, but I still do water aerobics because I love it!”

ThinkstockPhotos-480904565Suellen says that water aerobics follows the same format as other hour-long aerobics classes, “we start with a warm up of stretching exercises, and then spend most of the time on cardio, followed by a cool down. We use Styrofoam buoys for resistance exercise, and just like weights you use in the gym, these come in different “weights,” so we can increase resistance.”

Can Water Based Exercise Improve Bone Health

Water aerobics can help with bone health but is not as good as land-based exercise to strengthen bone, something Suellen found out when her doctor told her bone density was low. Suellen is working with a personal trainer who is knowledgeable about working with older adults with health issues. (I know this first hand, as I also worked with David when I had hip problems, for more on the benefits of working with a personal trainer, click here.)

Always a Teacher

Water aerobics
Class at YMCA, photo credit Bill Powell

Suellen taught 7th grade math for 29 years before she retired, but she sneaks some math lessons into her water aerobics classes now and then. “I’ll ask them to identify north, east, west, and south while we are in the pool and them ask them how that relates to the numbers on a compass, I guess once a math teacher, always a math teacher!” She loves the reactions she gets from the people who come to her class, “we have several people in their eighties who are regulars and they enjoy the exercise, but they really like the social aspects and the fun of the class.”

Tips for Optimal Aging

When I asked Suellen to identify the top three ways to optimal aging, not surprisingly, her first response was “move, move, move!” “My dad played golf at the age of 94 and moving is what keeps us all going.”

The second tip is to stay socially connected. It could be through an exercise class, volunteer activities, church groups, or as Suellen puts it, “anything that gets people going, gets them up, gets them dressed, and gets them out of the house so they develop a social connection to the place and to the people.” She works at getting to know the people in her class and “making them feel more comfortable about participating and looking forward to coming back is what matters.”

And, lastly, she said, “laughter, having fun and laughing during exercise is so rewarding, we laugh with each other and they laugh at me when I mess up, and that’s OK because it keeps us all laughing, having fun, and moving!”

For more information on eating well, moving well, and being well check out Food & Fitness After 50.

Copyright © 2019 [Christine Rosenbloom]. All Rights Reserved.

 

Food & Fitness After 50: The Benefits of Tai Chi

My friend Bonne asked about the health benefits of Tai Chi for older adults, so I was thrilled to meet Chris Cinnamon, owner and head instructor of Chicago Tai Chi.™ I met Chris, an American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) certified exercise physiologist, at the ACSM Health & Fitness Summit and we struck up a conversation about Tai Chi. I knew I had met the perfect person to help me understand and explain the benefits of this ancient martial art to my Food and Fitness After 50 friends.

From Navy Flier to Lawyer to Tai Chi Practitioner

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Chris practicing Tai Chi in Utah

Chris, age 59, is also an example of someone who eats well, moves well, and practices what it takes to be well, but his journey was a winding road that led him to his current path. After college, Chris joined the Navy where he flew carrier-based fighter jets. After his stint in the military he attended the University of Michigan Law School and had a successful law practice for over 20 years. As managing partner of a busy firm, it dawned on him that the “intensity and volume of work endemic to the law profession was shortening my life,” said Chris. That examination of his life while in his mid-40s made him map out a new plan. Athletic and a competitive martial artist, he discovered Tai Chi as “softer martial art.” So, he began training with a high-level Tai Chi Master. After the first week he knew that this was the right direction for his life.

As he transitioned out of law and into his new life, he decided to go back to school to get a graduate degree in exercise physiology to better understand the science behind movement and exercise. It was also a way to bridge the difference between Western and Eastern perspectives in promoting health and wellness.

Chicago Tai Chi

Founding Chicago Tai Chi was certainly “an unconventional step for a lawyer but it felt deeply right for me,” says Chris. He started his school as an experiment with just a few classes but in 8 years has grown it into the leading Tai Chi school in Chicago. “I teach 12 to 14 classes a week, see private clients for individual sessions, lead workshops, and manage a growing business. It’s hard work at times, but very meaningful and exciting.” With a total of three instructors, they have over 150 students attending classes, online trainings, and workshops.

Understanding Tai Chi

Tai chiWhen asked to explain Tai Chi to the uninitiated, Chris puts it this way. “I describe Tai Chi as a sophisticated exercise system.  Tai Chi originated as a martial art in China over 600 years ago. Introduced in the U.S. about 60 years ago, Tai Chi is mainly performed today as a health practice. It is a low impact, yet powerful whole-body exercise.” The benefits are many, “Tai Chi works the muscles, all connective tissues including fascia, the joints, the spine, and the nervous system.” Chris describes how, unlike many forms of exercise, Tai Chi works the entire body, even internal organs. “By performing smooth, fluid Tai Chi movements in increasingly connected ways, you work more than just muscles and the cardiovascular system, you intentionally work internal organs, like the kidney, liver, spleen, and digestive tract with gentle compressing and releasing motions. This promotes circulation of fluids, motility of tissue, and healthy functioning of organs. Healthy organs support healthy aging.”

When I asked Chris the difference between yoga and Tai Chi he described “yoga is a practice that assumes positions and holds them to stretch muscles and other tissues. Tai Chi is almost the opposite, you relax to stretch. The more you release tension, the more the tissues relax and elongate.”

“I have had extensive training in Tai Chi, Qigong, Meditation and related practices, some of which may seem esoteric.  My background helps me explain the health benefits of Tai Chi from a Western exercise science perspective. My clients and students find that really helpful,” says Chris.

The Health Benefits of Tai Chi

benefits-of-tai-chi-exercisesA recent review of research of the health benefits of Tai Chi reveals that the strongest evidence is for reducing fall risk and reducing pain from knee osteoarthritis. Evidence is also growing, but not conclusive for enhancing cognitive function, as well as many other health conditions.

Reducing fall risk is a critical for an aging population. A recent report in JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association) cites falls as “major epidemic” for older Americans. One in three persons over the age of 65 falls every year and falls can be life threatening. Broken hips, knees or ankles can mark the start of downward cycle of hospitalization, loss of independence, and lasting effects on both physical and mental health.

Several studies have shown that practicing tai chi helps reduce fall risk. Chris describes Tai Chi as a great exercise to combat all the things that contribute to falling. “Tai Chi can make you more stable and secure in your gait by strengthening leg muscles, which in turn makes you more confident in your abilities to move through space. I’ve seen clients get stronger after about 6 to 8 weeks of Tai Chi practice.”

Tai Chi is also a great exercise for those with knee osteoarthritis. Many people with knee pain stop exercising and Tai Chi can be great way for someone who has been sedentary, deconditioned, or overweight to begin exercising. “Tai Chi works the weight bearing joints and the gentle movement can help alleviate pain,” reports Chris.

From personal observation based on his 8 years of watching clients transform, Chris says “the emphasis on relaxing in Tai Chi has mental and emotional benefits. It calms the mind and helps people learn to cope with stress. My students and clients frequently report being less upset and reactive to stressful situations.”

Chris also shared a story of a long-time student who was practicing Tai Chi at home. Her husband observed her and remarked how graceful she looked. The woman was thrilled, no one had ever called her graceful before. That didn’t surprise Chris, “the neurological connections made in practicing Tai Chi lead to fluid, graceful movement.”

Getting started

older-adults-tai-chi-outside-e1505160556655I asked Chris how someone could get started in Tai Chi and what to look for in an instructor or class. “I suggest monitoring a class to learn about the instructor and students. Ask the instructor about his or her training and experience. And, the bottom line of any class, it should be convenient and enjoyable.” Chris offers a series of online courses and that is a good place to start if Tai Chi instruction is not available where you live. (Click here to learn more about the online courses.)

Advice for aging well

We closed our conversation by reviewing the three pieces of advice that Chris gives for optimal aging.

#1. Move more. “The research is overwhelming that activity reduces the risk of chronic disease. It doesn’t matter what you do, just move and get strong.”

#2. Pursue a practice that calms emotions and settles the mind. “High stress adversely affects health, and exercises like Tai Chi that emphasize relaxing and calming the mind can help with the mental side of life.”

#3. Eat well. “Get the advice of a qualified nutritionist.” Or in other words, don’t fall for the fads or diet du jour and learn to eat healthfully and with enjoyment.

I encourage you to visit Chicago Tai Chi™ website and follow Chris’ blog at this link.

For more information on eating well, moving well, and being well, check out Food & Fitness After 50.

Copyright © 2019 [Christine Rosenbloom]. All Rights Reserved.