Food & Fitness After 50: Should We Walk and Chew Gum at the Same Time?

This week, Dr. Bob Murray asks the question, “should we walk and chew gum at the same time?” It may sound humorous, but he presents some research that may have you grabbing for some gum at the grocery store checkout line! Thanks for your insights, Dr. Bob!

Gum chewingFrom the often-quirky world of science comes a study from Japan that reported increased fat burning in research subjects who chewed gum while they walked. Evidently, there is somewhat of a minor fixation in Japan on chewing as reflected by a Japanese government program called Kamingu 30 that encourages people to chew each bite of food 30 times before swallowing in an attempt to slow eating speed and thereby help combat increasing obesity in Japan.  It turns out that chewing gum stimulates our nervous system in ways that might increase the calories we burn during exercise. (The idea of chewing each bite of food a prescribed number of times hearkens back to Horace Fletcher, American health food enthusiast of the Victorian era. Horace, nicknamed “the great masticator,” believed that each bite of food should be chewed 100 times until it is liquefied before swallowing…even liquids were to be “chewed!”)

person_holding_chewing_gum_chewing_gum_and_IBSIn fact, a study published in 2018 showed that chewing gum while walking increased heart rate, calories burned, and the distance walked, so the same group of scientists followed up with a study that added other measures to get a more complete understanding of how gum chewing while walking might benefit weight control.  Fifteen healthy volunteers (10 male, 5 female), ages 27-58, completed two exercise sessions, both requiring them to walk at their own pace for 15 minutes on an indoor track.  During one session, the subjects chewed two pieces of gum throughout their walk.  During another session, they chewed and swallowed a tablet containing the same ingredients but without the gum portion.

In both sessions, the subjects wore heart rate monitors and other equipment that allowed the researchers to measure their energy (calorie) expenditure along with other measures such as step count, distance, and fat oxidation (fat burning).

The results were similar to that of the first study: when the subjects chewed gum while walking, they walked faster, took more steps, had higher heart rates, and burned more calories and more fat.  The differences were small but statistically meaningful.  The researchers speculated that the differences they found could positively affect weight control when the results were extrapolated over months of normal daily walking.  Scientific speculation of this sort often doesn’t pan out as predicted, but in this case, chewing gum while walking is not likely to cause any harm and might possibly add up to a meaningful calorie-burn over time. Other studies have shown that chewing gum reduces the number of calorie consumed at meals and increases the number of calories burned when gum is chewed after meals.

There are thousands of published studies on the effects of gum chewing.  It turns out that chewing gum is a simple way to help restore intestinal function after C-Sections and colorectal surgery.

Sugar-free gum aids dental health by stimulating saliva and remineralizing tooth enamel. Gum chewing also helps lower psychological stress.

It improves alertness (maybe that is why we’re seeing more pro golfers chew gum during tournaments?)

 92545738-56b007375f9b58b7d01f92dbNone of these results leads to the conclusion that we’d all be thin if we only chewed more gum.  The moral to this story is that there are little things we can do each day to help us burn more calories.  Sitting less, fidgeting when we do sit, moving more whenever possible, portion control at meals, staying hydrated, eating more fiber, and yes, chewing gum while walking can all add to managing our daily energy (calorie) input and output.

To learn more about eating well, moving well, and being well check out our book 

Food & Fitness After 50.

Copyright © 2019 [Christine Rosenbloom]. All Rights Reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Food & Fitness After 50: Uncured Bacon, Must be Healthy, Right?

Uncured baconHave you noticed the words, “uncured” “all natural,” and “no nitrates or nitrites added” on packages of bacon, hot dogs, sausage, or deli meats? The packaging usually conveys other messages, such as “made from pork raised without added hormones,” which is utterly meaningless as hormones are not allowed in raising hogs. (When you see a “no hormones added” claim on the label it is supposed to followed by this statement: “Federal regulations prohibit the use of hormones.” But, it is often in small print and hard to read!)

Why process meat at all?

But, let’s get back to the “uncured” part of the story. “We all want and expect our food to be safe,” says Dr. Jeff Sindelar, Associate Professor in the Department of Animal Science at the University of Wisconsin. Modern meat processing “is done with purpose, is more refined and effective than it was in the past,” he adds. To ensure the safety of products like bacon or hot dogs, they are cured with a sodium-based compound. “Salt curing has been around since the Chinese preserved fish as far back as 3500 BC and salting is a simple, effective way to decrease water activity in meat to stop microbial growth,” according to Dr. Sindelar. But, if you’ve ever eaten salt-cured meat, like country ham, your mouth will pucker from the high salt content and you’ll be reaching for gallons of water to quench your thirst.

Today, curing meat involves the use of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. Whereas in the past, salt concentrations of 4-5% were used to cure meats, today it has been reduced to about 1.5 to 1.75% with the use of sodium-based compounds. “Nitrate is chemically stable, so it must be converted to the active form, nitrite. Sodium nitrite can be found in both purified and natural forms, but the outcome is the same; to give cured meat its distinctive color, to impart flavor, to halt the growth of microbes, like Clostridium botulinum, and to act as an antioxidant,” says Dr. Sindelar. (Fun fact discovered in an article written by Dr. Sindelar and colleagues, nitrite is the chemical that inhibited the growth of Clostridium botulinum, a name given to the Latin word for sausage, “botulus,” because of the relationship between the microbe and poisoning from sausage.)

Chemophobia

Fast forward to 2019 and consumers are fearful of chemicals and especially food additives with hard to pronounce names. You’ve probably heard people say things like, “in our grandmother’s day they didn’t eat food with additives, so we shouldn’t either.”  First, that statement probably isn’t true and second, food additives make our food safer than in grandma’s time. And, there’s the where the disconnect comes in. “Consumers are equally fearful of food-borne illnesses and food additives, like nitrate and nitrite, yet the additives are key in helping keep us safe from food poisoning,” says Dr. Sindelar.  Another part of the nitrate and nitrite story, as mentioned above, is that nitrate and nitrite can be found in both purified and naturally occurring forms. It’s like vitamin C; you can get a naturally-occurring form from an orange or a purified form in a vitamin pill, but it is chemically the same compound, ascorbic acid, and your body treats it the same. Today we drink beet root juice for its health benefits, chief among them, dietary nitrite! The nitrite is converted in the body to nitric oxide or NO, a signaling molecule that helps regulate muscle blood flow with cardiovascular health and blood pressure lowering as the most promising health benefits.

Cancer Connection?

But what about an increased cancer risk with nitrate and nitrites, I’m often asked? “Sodium nitrate or nitrite by themselves are not cancer causing,” says Dr. Sindelar. The reason they have the reputation is that they can interact with other compounds in foods or during cooking, like certain amino acids (the building blocks of protein) when cooked over high heat (like frying bacon or sausage) to form compounds called nitrosamines. Nitrosamines were identified as carcinogenic before a better understanding of the role of nitrites in producing nitric oxide, which acts in a positive way in the body. And, Dr. Sindlear adds, “the carcinogenicity of nitrosamines is identified only in mice studies, not human studies.”

What is uncured meat?

So, let’s circle back to uncured, what does that mean? Celery and celery powder contain nitrites and are used in the same concentrations as purified nitrites to cure meats. But, because they come from a “natural” versus a purified form, they can be labelled as “uncured.” (A quirk in the food laws, according to Dr. Sindelar). All uncured really means is that it contains no purified sodium nitrate or nitrite, but the meats are still processed and still imparts the same qualities as to taste, appearance, and food safety. However, many see the “uncured” label and automatically see a halo of health hovering over the food.

To be clear, uncured bacon is still bacon. It is still about 40% saturated fat, and yes, it has a delicious flavor! Dietitians classify bacon as a fat, not a protein-rich food. If you enjoy the occasional slice of bacon or use a strip or two to flavor a dish, go for it. My concern is that people think bacon is “healthier” when it is uncured. Let’s get that clear…it is not.

caffeine mugIt might be helpful to remember that all foods are made of chemicals. Instead of fearing our food, let’s embrace balance in what we eat and remember that our food is made safer, convenient, and affordable to with today’s food processing. Scaring us about chemicals in our food may make for good clickbait, but I for one could not get through the day without my morning dose of 1,3,7-trimethylxanthine or the chemical name for caffeine. And, as if that isn’t enough, I also enjoy a food made of 12% sugar, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, histidine, proline, palmitic acid, linoleic acid, myristic acid, phytosterols, oxalic acid, tocopherol and hexonate or simply put, a banana.

Copyright © 2019 [Christine Rosenbloom]. All Rights Reserved.

Food & Fitness After 50: What do you want to know about seafood, salmon and fish oil supplements?

I’ve published over 150 blog posts on this site but today I’m asking YOU to help me on what you most want to know on all things seafood. I want to know your questions about fish!

In less than one month I will be on 7-day immersion trip to Alaska to learn all about salmon and seafood. The trip is build on 4 pillars of education, fishing, Alaska, and fellowship.

Fish oil pillsI’m preparing my list of questions, but I want to know what is of most interest to you so I can write about any or all of the following:

  • Wild-caught vs. farm-raised salmon nutritional differences
  • Seafood sustainability
  • Fresh, frozen, or canned salmon? Which is best?
  • How to choose a fish oil supplement
  • Which fish is the richest on omega-3 fatty acids?
  • Does the preparation method (frying vs. grilling) alter the good fats?

t_500x300So, please hit me up with your questions and I promise to come back with great information, amazing photos, and some interesting tales of being on a trawler in Bristol Bay (think “Deadliest Catch,” on second thought, I hope not too dangerous), sport fishing, touring the world’s largest floating seafood plant, hiking in Katmai National Park to watch bears catching salmon, and much more.

You can send questions by commenting at the bottom of this post, by email at chrisrosenbloom@gmail.com or on twitter @chrisrosenbloom

Stay tuned……

Oncorhynchus_nerka-1-e1418334906508

Food & Fitness After 50: Keep Food Safe This Summer

food safetyHow many of you enjoyed a cookout over the Memorial Day weekend? With summer right around the corner, grilling becomes even more popular. But, how many of you know that much of what you do to protect yourself, family, and friends from food poisoning begins and ends with what you do in your own kitchen? Food poisoning is more prevalent in the summer because bacteria multiply fast when the weather is warm and cooking outdoors means many food safety rules are view as suggestions that are easily ignored.

Food recalls seem to be everyday news, with the latest being 62,000 pounds of ground beef recalled and when you hear about these recalls it means that our food safety system is working. But, no one is going to recall Uncle Bob’s famous BBQ chicken or yummy guacamole if he makes some common mistakes in the kitchen or at the grill. Let’s see how well you spot Uncle Bob’s food safety no-nos. (Hint: there are 8 food safety rules broken and possibly 4 more!)

Uncle Bob buys cut up chicken parts at the grocery store and being an environmentally conscious consumer, brings his own reusable cloth bags. To save space when packing his groceries at checkout he packs the heavy melons on the bottom of the bag and puts the chicken on top, placing lighter items, like avocados and tomatoes in the top of the bag.

After shopping, Uncle Bob passes his golf club and decides to make a last-minute stop at the driving range to hit a few balls. An hour later, he heads home and unpacks his groceries, placing the chicken on the top shelf of the fridge.

To prepare for the BBQ, he washes the chicken in the kitchen sink and puts the washed pieces in a large bowl and pours his special BBQ sauce over chicken. As the meat marinates, he slices the melon using the same knife he used to trim the chicken. He cuts the avocados (using the same cutting board and knife) to make guacamole.

As his guests arrive, he turns on the gas to preheat the grill and slaps the chicken on the grates. While cooking, he uses some of the BBQ marinade to baste the chicken. To check for doneness, he cuts into a piece to visually judge it. Satisfied the chicken is thoroughly cooked, he puts the pieces back in the bowl with the remaining marinade and dinner is served!

Uncle Bob may have served up more than BBQ chicken; from grocery store to the dinner table, this meal was a recipe for disaster.

Mistake #1: Raw chicken should never be placed on top of other foods, especially fruits and veggies. Juices can drip down contaminating any food that it touches.

Mistake #2: It’s a big no-no to leave raw chicken in a hot car. Bacteria thrive in warm environments and a hot car is the perfect incubator for growing nasty bugs. In the summer, remember the 2-hour rule…never keep food out on a counter (or a hot car!) for more than 2 hours, and when the temps soar, the 2-hour rule becomes the 1-hour rule.

Mistake #3: Don’t store raw poultry on the top shelf of the fridge unless you put it on a plate to catch the juices (same idea as in mistake #1).

FightBac4QuadLogo125-1Mistake #4Stop washing raw chicken! Washing it in the sink or rinsing in a colander can spread the raw juices around sink, counter tops, and other foods that might be near by (like the melon or avocados that Uncle Bob is prepping for dinner). Cross contamination is never good!

Mistake #5: Speaking of cross contamination, always wash the cutting board and knife in hot soapy water before using it to cut veggies or fruits. Better yet, have separate cutting boards for produce and raw meats.Plastic-Cutting-Board

Mistake #6: Reusing the marinade on the chicken could spread bacteria lingering in the sauce from the raw chicken. It is better to have some extra sauce in a separate dish that hasn’t been in contact with raw poultry.

cooking-thermometerMistake # 7: Give Uncle Bob a food thermometer as a host gift! Chicken should be cooked to an internal temperature of a 165 degrees F. as measured with a thermometer, not Uncle Bob’s eyes.  Need another good reason to use a thermometer? There will be no danger of overcooking! Moist and tender chicken is the goal, not an overdone, tough bird.

Mistake #8: More cross contamination going on by putting the cooked chicken in the same unwashed bowl used to marinate the raw chicken. Once the chicken goes on the grill, take the used bowl or plate back to the kitchen sink for a thorough washing before reusing.

How many mistakes did you spot? And, what about the 4 possible infractions?

#1: Using cloth reusable bags is becoming more popular as we consider the environmental impact of plastic grocery bags, but did you know they can harbor bacteria if not washed? Toss bags in the laundry to keep them clean. In other words, “keep them clean while going green.” 16ce61dcf808d1a25e23e84e7ec62258

#2: Did Uncle Bob wash his hands before starting the food preparation? Let’s hope so because the dirtiest piece of equipment in your kitchen is your hands.

#3: Always wash melons or avocados under running water and use a scrub brush to wash the rind or peel. Why you ask, since you only eat what is on the inside? Dirt can harbor bacteria and when you slice through the rind, bacteria can be transferred to the flesh. So, wash first, cut second, then eat and enjoy.

#4: How clean is the grill? Keeping the grill clean makes the food taste better by removing grease (which can hold on to bacteria) and carbon deposits which can cause uneven heating. For tips on how to keep your grill in top shape, click here.

So, now you are prepared for a summer time full of great cookouts with good food and no bad bugs! For more information on home food safety click here and here.

Copyright © 2019 [Christine Rosenbloom]. All Rights Reserved.