Food & Fitness After 50: Updating Your Personal Mission Statement to Eat Well, Move Well, and Be Well in 2019

“The greater danger for most of us isn’t that our aim is too high and miss it, but that it is too low, and we reach it.” ~ Michelangelo

Last year, I shared that each December, my husband and I update our family mission statement, vision, and goals for the new year. (For the post, click here.)

We do this instead of New Year’s Resolutions because we all know what happens to those. How many regular gym goers notice that the classes are packed, the machines in full use, and the parking lot fuller in January? Then the resolutions fade and it is back to usual habits. So, this year, consider goal-setting for the year and reassessing them at the end of the year to understand what you accomplished and where you fell short.

Last year we added a goal of being more active volunteers in our community; something that was harder to achieve when we were working full time. I volunteered to deliver a series of nutrition classes at the local YMCA, talked to high school sports teams about nutrition, and became active in Friends of Library to support our local county library. My husband just finished his term as president of the local Kiwanis chapter and worked on projects to benefit the youth in our town.

This year, we added a few more goals:

  • To plan our meals for the week and shop our pantry before making weekly menus and grocery store lists. We think this will help reduce food waste (which is a big problem in the U.S.; consumers throw away 15-25% of all food purchased!) I wrote about food waste last January and here is a link to the post for more tips on reducing food waste and saving money.
  • Eat seafood twice a week; a recommendation made by major health organizations, but we fall short on that.
  • Eat more plant-based meals. We’ve never excluded meat from our diets, but this year we want to eat more fish and seafood and plant-based meals. Stay tuned for a future blog post featuring Sharon Palmer, The Plant-Powered Dietitian. I’ll be using loads of her recipes in 2019!
  • Plan our exercise for each week. We are good about regular exercise, but if we put it on our calendars we are more likely to do it.

So, this year, instead of making new year’s resolutions, make a family mission statement for solutions for all that you value.

goals

Food & Fitness After 50: Consider a Personal Trainer to Reach Your Fitness Goals

“The healthier I eat, the more energy I have for exercise. The more I exercise, the more I want to eat healthier food. For me, one leads to the other.”                                                                                                                                                                          David Leard

As I approached my mid-sixties I wanted to be more fit and kick up my fitness routine. At my local YMCA, the weight room intimated me. Not because I was unfamiliar with weight training, but the equipment was old and a mixture of various manufacturer’s equipment and the adjustments from one machine to the next were confusing*.  And, I’ve never had great core strength, so I decided to hire a personal trainer for a series of 6 lessons to help me meet my fitness goals. It was important to find a trainer who understood how to work with older adults, so I met David and knew I found the best trainer for me. After our training sessions, I asked David to share his journey to healthy aging and gained a lot from our interview. I think you will, too.

What was your career path before you became a personal trainer?

David at YMCAI began my career as an elementary school physical education teacher in my hometown. To earn some extra money, I delivered newspapers and that led to a career shift to newspaper production management with the Anderson(South Carolina) Independent-Mail and Athens (Georgia) Banner Herald. While in my forty’s I earned a second degree from the University of Georgia in Environmental Health Science and began serving as the Environmental Health Manager in the county where I stated as an elementary school teacher.

How did you get into personal training?

I’ve always been interested in fitness and began lifting weights at the age of 13 after watching my older brothers play high school football. I realized that if I wanted to get on the football field, I was going to have to get bigger and stronger. I enjoyed strength exercise so much as a youth, that I’ve continued it throughout adulthood. My wife, Jean, and I found space for a makeshift home gym wherever we’ve lived and used it to strength train. A few years ago, we started exercising at the Bell Family YMCA and really enjoyed the classes and the comradery with the members. While contemplating retirement from full time work, I knew I wanted part-time work to stay physically and mentally active.  Personal training was a natural progression and I like being able to make a difference in people’s lives. I got certified through the American Council on Exercise (ACE) )after about six months of preparation. I went on to earn an additional certification as an orthopedic specialist personal trainer to help meet my client’s needs.

David and Jean kettelbell
David & Jean after Kettlebell class

What do you do to stay active and has it changed as you’ve gotten older? 

Strength training with free weights was always my go-to form of exercising. I enjoyed it and thought it was a fun activity as another person might enjoy a sport like golf or pickle ball. But as I’ve gotten older I don’t care about how much I bench press and I put much more emphasis on my core as way of avoiding injury. When I feel myself pushing too hard, I try to think of “living to exercise another day.” What I do care about is strength training for functional fitness, such as playing with my grandchildren or being able to work in the yard.

What motivates you to stay active?

David TRX
David and daughter doing TRX

My family is my motivation to stay active. I enjoy playing and exercising with my 5 grandchildren ages 6 to 13 years. They are starting to get into exercise and I encourage them to find joy in movement. My wife and I really have fun trying to keep up with our two children and their spouses who are avid exercisers. And, I must stay fit for the never-ending amount of yard work at my house and I’m too cheap to pay a landscaper! I want to continue to be a vibrant husband, father, and grandfather so that my family can count on me in the future.

Do you follow any special diet, or do you have any tips for healthy eating that work for you?

I’ve never counted calories and I enjoy junk food as much as anyone, particularly when my grandchildren visit. But, for the most part I eat healthy and enjoy fruits and salads topped with lean protein. I try to make sure I’m eating some complex carbs for sustained energy. My weakness is sweets and I do allow myself some indulgences. If you look in my freezer you will probably find some chocolate I’ve hidden from myself. I’m very fortunate that my wife enjoys eating healthy foods, so we support and motivate each other to stay focused without any browbeating. I also find a direct correlation to eating well and exercise. The healthier I eat, the more energy I have for exercise. The more I exercise, the more I want to eat healthier food. For me, one leads to the other.

If you had to name 3 things you do to age well, what would they be? 

  • I manage my weight by eating healthy and exercising.
  • I complete all wellness exams with my physician, including recommended vaccinations.
  • I read and do research on the many facets of aging and I listen to health professionals.

What are the biggest challenges to aging well?

I find that many of the clients I work with at the YMCA are fighting through aches or pains, such as arthritis or bursitis, or old injuries that continue to linger. These folks may have gone through a hip or knee replacement or are putting off a needed surgery. Aches and pains can stall or halt any progress an individual has made in their exercise program. I can relate to that as I’ve recently begun to experience arthritis hip pain. Finding ways to work around the pain is a challenge. Most of my clients are my age or older and I am always researching ways to keep these clients moving through or around the difficulties with various exercise modifications. As a Certified Personal Trainer, I’m required to complete continuing education to maintain my certification and I seek out educational opportunities on these types of problems.

Do you have any words of wisdom for others?

That’s a challenging question for me in that I don’t consider myself smart enough to dispense words of wisdom! However, I do a lot of reading and research and I know there is a lot of free information on the internet about exercise, diet, and nutrition. Some of it is good and some not, so I encourage my clients to research the qualifications of the people who are giving free advice. Make sure your information and advice is coming from a qualified health professional.

What do you see in people you train in terms of what they do well and what you wish they would do more?

While all my clients have worked hard at their employment over the years, many haven’t exercised since they were young and are now recognizing the need because they are experiencing problems with basic movements, such as getting up and down from the floor or from the couch. I’m continually impressed with their dedication and willingness to work through the aches and pains and honored to be working with them. Many of my clients told me they regret not having started a regular exercise program earlier. I recommend that just like saving money for retirement, start an exercise program now and stay consistent.

Many of my clients are concerned about their weight. I encourage them to feed their exercise program with proper nutrition.  ChooseMyPlate.gov s a wonderful website full of good information on proper nutrition.

*Recently, the YMCA obtained new “used” equipment and the machines are much nicer and easier to use ! David helped me learn how to use all of the new machines.

 

Food & Fitness After 50: Answering Your Questions on Alcohol and Aging

I was invited to luncheon symposium on communicating alcohol guidelines to consumers while in Washington, DC for my annual food and nutrition conference. The lunch was sponsored by the Distilled Spirits Council* and after the event I reached out to Senior Vice-President of the council and former Division Director at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Dr. Samir Zakhari, to answer the questions asked by adults over the age of 50.

First, let’s be clear that the Dietary Guidelines for Americans include alcohol and say that if you drink alcohol “it should be consumed in moderation and only by adults of legal drinking age.” So, you are all of legal drinking age, but what does moderation mean? For women, it is up to one drink per day, and for men, up to two drinks per day. Sounds simple but check out the visual of what one drink looks like. And, just as I reminded college students in my teaching days, moderation does not mean saving it all for Friday night. Drinking more than four or five drinks in a couple of hours defines binge drinking, not moderation.

What is a drink

Here are the questions I asked of Dr. Zakhari and his responses may surprise you.

I hear some older adults say they don’t tolerate alcohol as well as they did when they were younger. Are there changes to how we metabolize alcohol as we age?

Yes, aging adults metabolize and eliminate alcohol at a slower rate than younger adults, which leads to higher blood alcohol levels and affects the brain at lower levels of intake. Add to that many older adults take medications that may interact negatively with alcohol. This may result in exaggeration or interference of therapeutic effect of some medications and/or exacerbation of adverse effects of others (e.g., aspirin, Tylenol). Another example is Ranitidine (Zantac) which is used to treat ulcers in the stomach and small intestines. It increases blood alcohol to levels known to impair motor skills needed for driving. Older adults who drink alcohol and who take medications should consult with their doctor or pharmacist to assess their risks and get advice about safe use of alcohol and medications.

Can you explain why moderate drinking is defined as 1 drink/day for women, but 2 drinks a day for men?

Alcohol’s effects are due to blood alcohol concentration (BAC) which is determined by the volume of total body water (TBW) and the amount of alcohol mixed with it. On average, women tend to be smaller than men, with lower body weight and higher proportion of fat to lean body mass. This generally results in a lower TBW in women, and hence a given dose based on per pound of body weight will result in a higher BAC in women than in men.  Thus, the lower definition of moderate drinking for women.

Many people think red wine is a “healthy” alcohol choice…can you explain why they think that and what the facts are about alcohol and disease/mortality reduction?

In the early 1990s, a 60-Minutes program segment with the catchphrase “The French Paradox” referred to the notion that despite eating cheese, pastries, and other rich fatty food the French people have relatively low rates of heart disease. Thus, the red wine health halo was born and the day after the story aired red wine sales increased 40%.

A theory has since developed that the potential health benefits of wine is due to a substance called resveratrol.  However, resveratrol is quickly eliminated from the intestine and one needs to drink large amounts of wine to attain any appreciable amounts of resveratrol.

However, later research showed that the potential health benefits (e.g., decrease in risk of heart disease or type 2 diabetes) due to moderate drinking of alcoholic beverages (wine, beer, and spirits) is due to alcohol content, not the resveratrol in red wine.

A bottle of beer (12 oz, 5% alcohol), a glass of wine (5 oz, 12% alcohol), or a shot of spirits (1.5 oz, 40% alcohol) contain the same amount of alcohol (0.6 oz, or 14 grams). It is also important to know that beer and wine alcohol content is increasing; some craft beers have up to 6.5% alcohol and the average alcohol of wine is around 13.5%, so it is increasing, too.

I’ve seen supplements of “red wine extract with resveratrol” claiming to do everything from preventing heart disease to life extension. Some older adults who choose not to drink are tempted to take resveratrol supplements; what is your take on it?

Resveratrol is a type of natural phenol that is present in the skin of grapes. After absorption from the intestine its bioavailability is quickly decreased due to extremely rapid metabolism in the liver and excretion in urine. Although it is sold as a dietary supplement, there is no good evidence that consuming resveratrol affects life expectancy or human health.

Many older adults experience “weight creep.” Could alcohol calories contribute to weight gain?

The human body can use energy from proteins and carbs (each produce four calories per gram), fat (one gram has nine calories), and alcohol (one gram provides seven calories). Calories produced from alcohol are termed “empty” calories and most of it is dissipated as heat. Moderate drinking may not contribute much to increased body weight; in fact, some studies show no increase in body weight in women after moderate drinking, but chronic heavy alcohol consumption may result in increased weight. And, we should also consider that many mixes with distilled spirits can be high in calories and that we often snack with our alcoholic beverages. Calories from alcoholic beverages are produced not only from alcohol but also from carbs (approximately 2 grams/glass of wine; 12 grams/bottle of beer, and zero grams from spirits not mixed with calorie containing additives).

As the holiday season is upon us, many hangover cures will be circulating. What causes the symptoms of a hangover and is there really any cure?

Hangover is mainly due to dehydration and sleep interruption due to excessive drinking.  Some also say it is due to the presence of “congeners” – chemicals produced in dark drinks but not in distilled spirits. The best cure for hangover is people who choose to drink should drink moderately, with plenty of water and try to sleep longer.  Remedies claimed to treat hangover are largely ineffective.

Thanks to Dr. Zakhari for taking time to answer your questions. For more information check out Drink in Moderation from the Distilled Spirits Council and Rethinking Drinking from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

*I was not asked or compensated to write this post.

For more information on alcohol and many other topics of interest to those of us over 50, check out Food & Fitness After 50, available at Amazon and other book sellers.

Food & Fitness After 50: A, B, Cs of Aging (Agility, Balance, and Coordination)

After hip replacement surgery I was looking for a class that would continue my rehabilitation and help me be more flexible, agile, and coordinated as I approached my mid-60s. I found it, and so much more, at a twice weekly 60-minute “yo-flex” class at my local YMCA. The class combines classical yoga poses, with Pilates moves, and balance exercises; it’s been 5 years since my first class and I’m hooked!

Exercise physiologist, Dr. Bob Murray, co-author of Food & Fitness After 50, reminds us that balance, flexibility, and agility can all be improved with regular practice and should be part of a well-designed exercise program for older adults. “Balance, flexibility, and agility wane with age mostly because we neglect them. One of the many negatives associated with a sedentary lifestyle is that overall motor function—our ability to move in unrestricted ways—atrophies along with muscle mass. It’s true that if we don’t use it, we lose it, and that applies to balance, flexibility, and agility. All too often, balance, flexibility, and agility training are neglected in favor of cardiovascular and strength training.”

When I said I found so much more than an exercise class, I meant that I also found a friend in instructor, Tina. I asked Tina about her journey to healthy aging and I think her story will resonate with many of you and inspire everyone.

What do you do to stay active and has it changed as you’ve reached your fifties?

Tina HowardWell, as you know I love yoga!  I practice twice a week at the YMCA and sometimes at home with videos on Yoga with Adriene.  I also enjoy taking yoga classes when I travel to learn from other instructors. I started playing pickleball last year and really enjoyed that until I had knee surgery.  For now, I am limited to light weight training and yoga until my knee integrates fully.  It’s funny how you can be lazy and just think, “I will work out tomorrow,” but when you are injured and can’t exercise, it is all you want to do!

My activity level has been up and down over time.  When I was young, we lived in a city where just going outside was dangerous, and so I was a chubby kid – short for my age, and very round.  I watched a lot of TV.  Then we moved to a suburb with broad streets and little traffic.  Like a lot of 1970s kids, we were on bikes all day…flying around the neighborhood, playing kickball and touch football, only coming inside when it was too dark to see.  I stayed active throughout my twenties and thirties by running and cycling.  My husband is an ex-athlete, so we enjoyed an active lifestyle until kids came along.  As a working parent with three children, my spare time was spent watching my kids play sports.  I began to feel bad and started having aching joints and muscle spasms.  And, then I discovered yoga. Research supports the benefits of yoga for balance and flexibility, and more recently it has been shown to help ease pain of knee osteoarthritis in older women.

What motivates you to stay active? 

When I was younger, I would sign up for competitive road races.  I am a goal-oriented person, so having entered a race made me stick to a training schedule.  As I entered middle age, it came down to something much simpler: I feel really bad when I don’t move. I feel much better when I do.

I know you are a vegetarian; what led you to adopt that dietary pattern?

I don’t eat meat and haven’t since I was a kid.  I’ve always loved animals and my dad took me on farm tours when I was young. Seeing poultry and cattle production and realizing they were being raised for food just bothered me, so I decided to be a vegetarian. And, besides the ethical issues for me, vegetarian diets provide health benefits for the prevention and treatment of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, and some cancers.

I have a healthy appetite and could eat all day long, but I’ve found a way to keep hunger in check. I keep a stash of raw almonds everywhere – my car and my briefcase.  They’re a little sweet, so they satisfy my sweet tooth while providing protein, healthy fats, and fiber, so I feel satiated.  Almonds pair well with bananas and apples for a quick breakfast or snack, and they also pair with dark chocolate for a sweet treat.

If you had to name 3 things you do to age well, what would they be?

  1. Learn to read your body’s cues. Try to understand why you feel bad, why you are grouchy, sore, irritated, or sick.  Then, be prepared to try to do some self-care to remedy it.  Many of our health issues are self-inflicted by poor diet and lack of exercise. So, instead of reaching for a pill, first try a lifestyle change.
  2. Hormonal changes, especially at menopause, can lead to insomnia, fatigue, bone and muscle loss, and an increase in belly fat. Find a doctor that understands the hormonal changes of aging and work together to find a solution that is best for you. And, ask your doctor to check other hormone levels, like thyroid and Vitamin D, and if the levels are out of the normal range, remedy it before it leads to major health problems.
  3. Socialize often. With age often comes isolation from kids leaving home, retirement, or the loss of parents or friends. Social interaction takes more planning and effort as we age – if we don’t have to be somewhere, it is easy to stay in our comfort zone at home. Social activities and social connections are important to our mental health.  And, by social interactions, I don’t mean Facebook or Instagram!

Do you have any words of wisdom for others?

Find a healthy activity you like and go do it, no matter what.  Don’t wait for your spouse to join you or your friends to sign up with you.  Be prepared to go it alone, be prepared to try a million different things, and be prepared to feel awkward.

When I started practicing yoga, it felt foreign and silly.  Here were these hippy-dippie instructors with belly button rings that could bend themselves into shapes I could only imagine! I’d be in sweatpants, trying to fold myself over after a day at the desk, and I’d think, “this is so not me!” But, I kept going anyway ,and although I didn’t become like the other people, I eventually got comfortable in my own skin and accepted what I could do. Fitting in was more about me accepting myself than being like the others.  So, find your joy – live in it every day.